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January 20, 1985|HOWARD ROSENBERG

"PRESIDENTIAL INAUGURATION," Monday--What looks like a rerun and sounds like a rerun, but isn't a rerun? Give up? Ronald Reagan's Inauguration as President.

Monday is the big day.

The President will be sworn in privately Sunday (the Constitution mandates Jan. 20 as Inauguration Day), when perhaps more than 100 million Americans will be watching the Super Bowl on ABC. But the public ceremony and accompanying ritual will follow on Monday. And you can see it all--and hear it from your favorite news anchors--on TV.

The public swearing in is scheduled for 9 a.m., followed by Reagan's inaugural address. Then comes the inaugural parade up Pennsylvania Avenue. But there's much, much more.

TV will use this occasion as an opportunity to review Reagan's first four years in the White House and speculate about his second term. Hence, scores of reporters and commentators will be on hand to cover this more as a news event than as a ceremonial rite.

NBC (Channels 4, 36, 39), with Tom Brokaw anchoring the most coverage planned by the big three commercial networks, will begin its six--hour Inauguration marathon at 7 a.m.

CBS (Channels 2, 8), with Dan Rather as anchor, and ABC (Channels 7, 3, 10, 42), with Peter Jennings and David Brinkley co-anchoring, each plan five hours, starting at 8 a.m. "Nightwatch," 2-6 a.m. on CBS, also will focus on the Inauguration, as will ABC's "Nightline" at 11:30 p.m.

PBS (Channels 28, 15, 50) is offering an hour of raw pool coverage starting at 8:30 a.m.

By far the most comprehensive coverage has been taking place on the 24-hour Cable News Network, which reported live on various Friday and Saturday inaugural festivities leading up to Monday's event, which CNN will cap off with coverage of inaugural balls.

Also participating is C-SPAN, which will follow its live coverage of the swearing-in ceremony with its customary viewer call-ins, plus coverage of inaugural balls.

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