Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

All Shapes & Sizes

March 17, 1985|VIRGINIA GRAY and MAGGI MILLER

There's a new image for water in the home landscape. Today's pools and spas are far different than their predecessors. They fulfill dual goals: serving specific fitness functions is equally as important as their distinctive designs.

Total package: a multipurpose pool design Not only did Carol and Paul Frimmer want a pool in which they could do some serious swimming but they also preferred a pool, shown at right and above, that would suit the geometric design of their house. This pool even turns corners, creating intimate pocket pools within itself. And, of course, there's a spa. Architect Marshall Lewis AIA, who designed the Frimmers' contemporary house, worked with the Frimmers on the pool's design. Brick trims the perimeters; bright, navy-blue tile trims the waterline and the wall at the point where the spa spills over into the pool. The contractor was New View Developments, Hidden Hills. Designed by Carol Frimmer, the adjustable canvas overhang provides a shady retreat. The Moroccan buffet was provided by the Marrakesh, Studio City and Newport Beach. All of the tableware, the towels and other accessories are from Bullock's; the plants are from Sperling Nursery, Calabasas.

An illusion of flowing water The spa, a product of the '70s and '80s, was not an integral part of pool design until recently. Landscape designer Dennis Stevens was asked to add a spa, left, and to remodel an outdated pool at the site of the 1984 Pasadena Showcase House of Design. Stevens says the 20x60-foot pool had been remodeled before, about 30 years ago. Now, in its third incarnation, the pool sports a fountain that mirrors the glass block of the newly added spa. Underwater surfaces are lined with white tiles that "throw daylight behind the glass block," Stevens says. "And at night, when the spa is lit, it bubbles and shimmers like a champagne glass." Between the spa and the pool, located in a water-filled space about eight feet from pool, is an attractive "floating" step that creates the illusion that water is flowing from the spa,

beneath the deck and into the pool.

An landscape designer's imaginative solution to to a need for a totaL outdoor-living environment, a garage addition and the saving of gracious oaks.

Nearly every backyard has its limitations when the addition of a swimming pool is considered. In the case shown here, homeowners Frank and Mary Haltom of San Marino not only wanted a pool, but they also needed a new garage, since the original attached garage had been integrated into a family room when the house was remodeled. The Haltoms called upon landscape architect Mark Berry ASLA of the Pasadena and San Juan Capistrano firm of Berry & Dunbar to help them do the job properly. "I approach pool design from the perspective of suiting both the site and the style of the house," Berry says. "And the traditional, rather-English-and-French flavor of the Haltoms' house dictated the pool's style and the materials that were used, such as the Santa Maria sandstone decking that links the pool with the terrace and patio areas." Ever mindful of preserving all the old oak trees on the site, Berry created a rectangular pool, plastered gray for reflective quality and heat retention; stepped upward from the pool, he placed the spa. "In this case, the slope of the backyard provided an obvious solution to the problem of where the new detached garage would be placed--in a spot that would not detract from the spacious, oak-filled landscape," Berry says. Now, the Haltoms' driveway winds down the slope to a three-car garage, the roof of which is shown above and at left; it has been turned into a stepped-up, walled-in patio that has been integrated into the overall design scheme. This unusual rooftop patio provides a practical place for entertaining and for looking out onto the pool to the right and onto the tennis court below. R. B. Perry and Associates, Pasadena, was general contractor; landscape designer Walter Rutiman of San Marino specified all flowers and plants for the yard. Laura Bayne andWalter Hubert of Silver Birches, Pasadena,created this festive pool-side setting,repast and seasonal flower arrangement. The outdoor furniture by Triconfort is from Berk's,Santa Monica; tableware is from Bullock's; accessories are from Jacquerie, Pasadena. Doctor's prescription: a long, solar lap pool

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|