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SACRAMENTO FILE

March 20, 1985|Jerry Gillam | Times Staff Writer

Governor Appointed Raymond V. Stone of Escondido as chairman of the state Water Resources Control Board. The position pays $61,845 yearly; the job is subject to Senate confirmation. A Republican, Stone is the executive vice president of a San Diego-based engineering firm. He replaces Carole A. Onorato of Olympic Valley, who resigned.

Senate Committee Action: Legislative Pay: The Senate Appropriations Committee unanimously approved an Assembly-passed bill (AB 120) to increase legislative salaries by 10%, from $33,732 to $37,105 a year, starting in December, 1986. A 9-0 vote sent the bill, sponsored by Assemblyman Louis J. Papan (D-Millbrae), to the upper house floor.

AIDS: The same Senate committee also approved two Assembly-passed bills aimed at reducing public fear about the risk of contracting acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) through blood transfusions. The two bills are designed to encourage potential AIDs victims to take free blood tests at special clinics instead of going to blood banks, and to protect their privacy. Temporary emergency regulations to accomplish these goals already are in effect. AB 488 by Assemblyman Mike Roos (D-Los Angeles) and AB 403 by Assemblyman Art Agnos (D-San Francisco) were sent to the Senate floor by 8-0 and 6-1 votes, respectively.

Miscellany A Million-Dollar Child Support Payment: A record-high check for more than $1 million, representing January collections of the Child Support Intercept Program, has been forwarded to the Department of Social Services by the Employment Development Department. The department picked up the money by deducting it from unemployment insurance benefits of individuals who were delinquent in making court-ordered child support payments. The money now goes to the counties and they will distribute it to eligible recipients. The 1982 law setting up the program was sponsored by Assemblyman William H. Lancaster (R-Covina).

Church Tax Status Change: The state Franchise Tax Board has revoked the tax-exempt status of the Universal Life Church of Modesto, which allows people to become ministers by mail order. From now on, the church will be considered a general corporation, with all income taxable, and charitable contributions to the church no longer will be tax deductible. The Internal Revenue Service revoked the church's federal tax exemption last August. The church is suing the IRS.

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