Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

Listen

April 26, 1985| Compiled by the Fashion85 Staff

Lesley Ann Warren and Lauren Hutton were spotted together by Listen (although they didn't know it)--in Mark Richards' makeup room at Aida Thibiant's facial salon in Beverly Hills. Warren wore tights, a mini dress and black flats, had a script under her arm and told Richards that she'll soon start shooting her new film, "Clue." Hutton wore sweats and tennis shoes and told Richards that she too will soon start shooting a film--with Joan Collins. Makeup man Richards says he has no idea if the two actresses know each other. "They were both so absorbed in selecting cosmetics that they never looked up to see who else was around." And that's the way it is in star-studded Beverly Hills.

Desperately Seeking Marlene: When rock-star-turned-film-star Madonna appears this weekend at Universal Amphitheatre, she'll be wearing what L.A. designer Marlene Stewart calls "a small collection of clothes"--about 30 different pieces in all, Stewart says. "I designed a psychedelic print jacket and tights and an oversize man's-trenchcoat style in green satin floral brocade, along with several jackets and skirts. Madonna's favorite color right now is a kind of turquoise green. And she likes to wear tights all the time--some with paisley cutouts so you can see the flesh." Stewart used to design for the likes of you and me when she owned a company called Covers and sold her clothes to local stores. But running a garment business was "truly the pits," Stewart says. Now she only designs for rock stars, including Annie Lennox, who wears Stewart's sequined black sheath in her new video, "Would I Lie To You?" Stewart says the piece de resistance of Madonna's current show is "a sort of wedding dress" that looks like a man's tailored jacket. It's white brocade with lace and pearls and has a 10-foot white tulle train. "The train is detachable, and she takes it off and uses it as a prop," Stewart says.

Bob Mackie,known for his Hollywood glamour gowns, also gets the most glamorous front-row crowd at his New York shows. At his fall show this week, the front-runners included Bernadette Peters, Marlo Thomas, Polly Bergen (who tells Listen that she's doing a new column for women on just about everything), Alexis Smith and Mackie's former employer, Carol Burnett, with daughter Carrie Hamilton. Listen asked Burnett if she was at the show to do some fall shopping. "I'm here just to watch," Burnett said. But Carrie--who reportedly wants to be a model--piped up: "I'm here to shop." Burnett retorted: "On her budget, she can afford a sleeve."

Czech costume designer Theodor Pistek recently won an Oscar for his period clothes and wigs in "Amadeus." And with all the recent interest in looking wigged out, Listen couldn't resist asking Pistek--who attended Norma Kamali's fall show in New York this week--if those pink, blunt-cut punk wigs he did for Mozart were authentic or strictly film fantasy. "They wore wigs in many colors then, but I used a little fashion license with the styles I did for Mozart," Pistek said.

Katharine Hepburn, who almost rivals Garbo for being reclusive these days, did turn out for a preview performance of the new Broadway musical "Big River" in New York. Hepburn obviously pooh-poohs the notion that one should dress for the theater. She came in a black cotton high-neck T-shirt, baggy khaki slacks, a red sweater tied around her neck and her hair tossed casually on top of her head. Hepburn watched the entire show while chewing on the wand of her eyeglasses.

Here's Listen's lesson on what not to call a model. At the WilliWear fall show this week in New York, a photographer said to veteran model Alva Chinn: "Honey, look this way." Chinn replied: "Don't call me honey. I'm not your honey." The photographer came back with: "Look, I'm just trying to do my job." Chinn said: "And I'm just trying to do mine." She then turned a very cold shoulder on the shutterbug.

How do you transform a lovable guy into a Mafia-type hit man? Actor Richard Mulligan is finding that a lot depends on the clothes. Mulligan, who played the beloved Burt in "Soap," and who also appeared as a harmless type in a few of Blake Edwards' films, is now playing a gangster in the Columbia picture, "A Fine Mess." For the part, he's wearing a 1960s-style wardrobe of large-brim, light-color felt hats with checked sport jackets, pale wool slacks and pale silk shirts. Mulligan's hair was permed to look soft and curly. "And guess what?" the actor asks. "Everyone's telling me how great I look in my new clothes and hair style. They say they'd like to buy the same kind of stuff." But they can't. Mulligan's clothes, by Oscar-nominated (for "2010") costume designer Patricia Norris, were made to order at Western Costume.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|