YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections


Rona Barrett Is Back, And Kfwb's Got Her

May 14, 1985|DENNIS McDOUGAL | Times Staff Writer

After a month of hassling, Miss Rona's daily entertainment reports from Hollywood are finally being heard in Hollywood.

Rona Barrett whined back into action over KFWB-AM (980) at 6:35 a.m. Monday with the news that Cox Communications Inc. was buying into the Alan Landsburg Co. and that Eddie Murphy would probably do a Neil Simon screenplay as his next film project. Her reports air thrice daily (again at 9:11 a.m. and 12:11 p.m.) over the all-news outlet.

But her daily 2 1/2-minute reports, heard over 160 U.S. stations courtesy of the Mutual Broadcasting System, had a tough time finally making it to the Los Angeles radio market.

Mutual executives wooed the general manager of their Los Angeles affiliate, KMPC-AM (710), during last month's National Assn. of Broadcasters convention in Las Vegas in a vain attempt to get the nostalgia outlet to broadcast Miss Rona's re-entry into the world of broadcast. (Her last regularly broadcast entertainment news reports were during her stint on NBC-TV's "Today" three years ago.)

Even though KMPC General Manager Bill Ward posed with Barrett for publicity stills in Las Vegas on April 15, the day her Mutual radio show debuted, he was hesitant about committing to the program. A KMPC spokesman said at the time that if Barrett weren't picked up, it would be a programming decision based on how her entertainment reporting fitted in with KMPC's big band music, Angels baseball and its other programming.

Miss Rona was on assignment Monday and unavailable for comment, according to a spokeswoman for her newly formed company, Rona Barrett Communications Inc. Besides developing her radio reports, her Beverly Hills-based company also is working on similar televised reports for satellite syndication, TV specials and a phone-in system that will allow entertainment news fans to dial a special number for the latest and hottest Hollywood news.

Mutual spokesman Mark Feldman said it took a full month to get Rona on the air because the exclusivity clause in the affiliate's contract gives a Mutual station--such as KMPC--first right of refusal for 30 days. As a result, KFWB--which is not a Mutual affiliate-- was not allowed to begin airing the reports until Monday, he said.

"Every city is different," Feldman said. "In this instance, KMPC decided against it."

KMPC is airing Mutual's other star, however. Feldman said that late-night talk-show host Larry King, who's heard from midnight to dawn over KMPC, renewed his contract with Mutual for five years on Monday.

Under the new contract, his live call-in program will air only four hours instead of its current five, Feldman said. The final hour of the five-hour program will be a taped repeat of the first hour, from midnight to 1 a.m., when King normally interviews a studio guest, according to Feldman.

ROYAL WRATH: Even royalty must watch what they say and do these days around the new owners of KRLA-AM (1110).

(Emperor) Bob Hudson, who ends his 6 to 9 a.m. weekday show with the admonition to his listeners that they had best get off the freeway because "His Highness is coming," was formally chastised last month by station operations director Jay Clark for calling rival morning deejay Robert W. Morgan and putting him on the KRLA airwaves.

According to Clark's memo, Hudson's on-air call to KMGG-FM's (105.9) Morgan was funny but "a direct violation of Greater Media rules."

Greater Media Inc. is the New Jersey-based radio chain that bought KHTZ-FM (97.1) six years ago and purchased KRLA in March. Clark is an East Coast executive who was imported to raise the two stations' sagging Arbitron ratings.

One of the first actions Greater Media took following the takeover of KRLA was the firing of such station staples as morning drivetime deejay Dave Hull and the afternoon man Mucho Morales, who has since moved over to KMGG as a vacation fill-in personality. Both Hull and Morales told The Times that KRLA lost its union contract when Greater Media took over and gave both deejays their walking papers.

Hudson, who was hired March 1 to replace Hull, was actually removed from the air for a day when he persisted in calling Morgan in direct violation of Clark's edict.

Clark told The Times on Monday that removing Hudson from the air for the day was partly a publicity stunt, but the memorandum threatening Hudson with firing if he did not stop his disobedience was not a stunt.

"I wanted to make my point," Clark said. "We have a license to protect and a community to serve, and there are rules that must be observed."

Almost in the same breath, however, Clark pointed out that the latest Arbitron ratings show that KRLA climbed from a 1.6 to a 2.2 rating since Hudson's tussle with Clark.

PROGRAM NOTES: KFAC-AM (1330) and FM (92.3) celebrate Otto Klemperer's 100th birthday at 7 p.m. today with an hourlong tribute to the legendary composer/conductor. . . .

Los Angeles Times Articles