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Revised Subdivision Plan Approved

June 13, 1985|SUE AVERY | Times Staff Writer

MONROVIA — The City Council has approved a revised plan for a foothills subdivision that was rejected by voters four years ago.

The routine council action last week was in marked contrast to the acrimonious debate between the council and residents that led to the project's defeat in 1981.

Original plans for the Gold Hill subdivision were bitterly opposed by foothill residents, who objected to the high density and land grading that would be involved in the project north of the junction of Alta Vista and North Street.

The council approved the original plans for a 60-parcel, 90-acre subdivision in November, 1980, but when opponents gathered the necessary signatures to qualify the issue for a referendum, the council reversed itself and voted to call a special election on the issue. Two-thirds of the voters in the June, 1981, election, cast ballots against the plan.

The city and opponents of the Gold Hill plan later agreed on a compromise hillside ordinance, which satisfied the developer, the city and nearby residents as the best approach to developing the area, said Don Hopper, director of Community Development,

Under the revised plan, Fargo Development will level land for 55 lots on 60 acres of the 90-acre hillside, leaving the remaining 30 acres as open space.

Hopper said that residents originally were concerned about grading that would have scarred the hillside. Under the revised plan, the development will fit the terrain rather than making the terrain fit the development.

"Grading will be to preserve the hillside terrain and character," Hopper said.

Hopper said the city also will require studies to ensure that home location and design will preserve views and the hilly nature of the site.

George Baker, an opponent of the original plan, said there was no opposition to the project this time because the revised plan overcame the earlier objections.

"The 60 acres are also on more level, less rugged terrain than the original plan called for," he said.

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