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Guest Conductors For Glendale Season Listed

August 02, 1985|LARRY GORDON

Lalo Schifrin, Henry Mancini, Anshel Brusilow and John Williams will serve as guest conductors with the Glendale Symphony during the 1985-86 season. All four, orchestra officials say, are being considered for the open position of musical adviser and permanent conductor.

Carmen Dragon, the Glendale Symphony's conductor for 19 years, died in 1984. His successor, Daniel Lewis, served one season then resigned after reportedly trying to change the orchestra's tradition of light classics and pops to what board president Harlan Huebner called "heavier" music.

Shirley Seeley, the volunteer administrator of the orchestra, said that 55 people have sent in resumes for the job. "We are looking for another successful marriage," she said, referring to the long-term union between the Glendale and Dragon. A decision is expected by spring.

The orchestra's 62nd season is scheduled to begin Oct. 19 under the baton of Schifrin, who will conduct "Carmen" Suite No.1 by Bizet, "Bachianas Brasileiras" No. 5 by Villa-Lobos, the Piano Concerto No. 1 by Liszt (with soloist Daniel Pollack), "La Valse" by Ravel, and Symphonic Dances from "West Side Story" by Bernstein. On Dec. 10 and Dec. 16, Schifrin will lead a Christmas program, with Ricardo Montalban as narrator and the Northridge Masterworks Chorale.

Mancini and Williams will lead pops concerts mainly of their own music, on Nov. 23 and April 12, respectively.

Brusilow, the former concertmaster of the Philadelphia Orchestra and conductor of the Dallas Symphony, is now head of orchestral activities at Southern Methodist University. On Jan. 18, he will conduct "American Festival Overture," by Schuman, the Violin Concerto by Mendelssohn (with Erick Friedman as soloist), and Symphony No. 2 by Sibelius. On Feb. 22, Brusilow's program is to include Barber's Piano Concerto (with Tedd Joselson), "Benvenuto Cellini" overture by Berlioz, "L'Apres-midi d'une faune" by Debussy, and a suite from "Der Rosenkavalier" by Strauss.

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