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Only One Incumbent Running in Beverly Hills : School Board Veteran Bows Out of Race

August 15, 1985|JOHN L. MITCHELL | Times Staff Writer

Jerry Weinstein, a nine-year veteran of the Beverly Hills Board of Education, has announced that he will not seek reelection in November.

His decision makes school board President Fred Stern the only incumbent running for one of two open slots on the board.

Other candidates are Lora Klinger, a former teacher who ran unsuccessfully two years ago; Rhea Kohan, an author and former teacher, and Dana Tomarken, the director of the Beverly Hills Education Foundation and daughter of City Councilwoman Annabelle Heiferman.

The filing deadline is 5 p.m. Friday.

School finances are expected to be the major campaign issue this fall. School officials are considering massive cuts in the district's $25-million budget. They estimate that at the current rate of spending and with its present resources, the district will have to trim $5 million from the budget by 1986.

The school board is considering several options aimed at balancing the budget, including curtailing educational programs, layoffs and the imposition of a $400-per-parcel property tax that would have to be approved by a two-thirds vote.

Weinstein, an attorney, issued a brief statement on his intention to resign before leaving last week for a vacation in Scandinavia.

"He has been one of the most outstanding board members I have had the opportunity to work with," Supt. Leon Lessinger said. "He not only brings the legal background to the board but a special interest in school curriculum."

Lessinger said that Weinstein was instrumental in helping the district revamp the high school schedule to include more classroom time for students.

Weinstein has also been an outspoken critic of the City Council and angered several council members when he publicly accused the city of reneging on its agreement to provide $2.4 million in financial assistance to the schools. City officials say they held up the money because of questions over the legality of the financial agreement.

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