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The Nation

September 13, 1985

In an unusual demonstration of international cooperation, leaders of Soviet, European, Japanese and U.S. efforts to explore Halley's comet in March agreed to an immediate exchange of their findings. "There never has been a meeting like this," said Burton Edelson, an associate administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Five spacecraft from the Soviet Union, the European Space Agency and Japan are now en route to the world's most famous comet. The United States will use its space shuttle and a satellite around Venus to observe the comet and will use powerful ground stations to track the space probes.

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