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Bush Sees Stronger China Ties Despite Taiwan Arms Question

October 15, 1985|United Press International

PEKING — Vice President George Bush said today that he sees a broad strengthening in Sino-American relations despite stern warnings from Chinese officials over U.S. arms sales to Taiwan.

Bush, speaking to reporters at the end of a 2 1/2-day visit to Peking, said Taiwan figured prominently in several of his meetings with top Chinese officials. But he said it did not dominate the discussions.

Chinese press reports stressed Peking's concern over American arms sales to Taiwan, warning that the policy could lead to serious setbacks in Sino-U.S. relations.

In talks with Bush today, Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping said that while Sino-U.S. ties are "normal on the whole," they cannot develop smoothly in all fields until the "major question" of Taiwan is settled.

Despite Chinese claims to the contrary, Bush said Washington is abiding by Sino-U.S. communiques calling for a gradual reduction in the quantity and quality of arms sold to Taiwan.

He said in his discussions that he detected no new sense of urgency nor any sign of Peking's changing its position on U.S. ties with Taiwan.

"No one issue or problem constitutes a major theme of this visit," Bush said. "Sino-U.S. relations have moved beyond the point where one issue, one problem, one area of concern, can dominate the relationship."

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