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The Week

November 17, 1985|ELLEN MELINKOFF

EVENTS Children's Expo '85, an educational family event at the Long Beach Convention Center, is on through today. Telephone (213) 434-4862 for more information . . . The West Arcadia Invitational Band Review, in which 40 high school bands compete in a parade from Santa Anita race track to Camino Real along Baldwin Avenue, takes place Saturday; (818) 446-1575 . . . Birdwalk at Cabrillo National Monument, Saturday; (619) 293-5450. CELEBRATIONS Today is Home Made Bread Day . . . On Nov. 18, 1928, Mickey Mouse made his film debut in "Steamboat Willie" . . . Monday is Linda Evans' birthday. She was born in 1942 . . . Los Angeles Board of Education member Jackie Goldberg was born on the same day in 1944 . . . Los Angeles City Councilman Hal Bernson was born Nov. 19, 1930. . . Tuesday is also Jodie Foster's birthday. She'll be 23 . . . Goldie Hawn, nee Goldie Jean Btudlendgehawn, was born Nov. 21, 1945. ONLY YESTERDAY Thirty years ago this week, "Rebel Without a Cause" was in its second smash week . . . Two other top movies--"The Tender Trap" and "Guys and Dolls"--starred Frank Sinatra . . . Herman Wouk's "Marjorie Morningstar" and Anne Morrow Lindbergh's "Gift From the Sea" topped the Southern California best-seller lists . . . At Frank Sennes' Moulin Rouge nightclub on Sunset Boulevard, dinner, a show and dancing ran $5.50 per person . . . Mandel's was touting $6.98 ballet slippers--"black kid flecked with Decca records"--as perfect with the new toreador pants . . . Ethel Barrymore and Ronald Reagan starred on "General Electric Theater" . . . Johnny Carson guested on "The Jack Benny Show" . . . Robie the Robot, a remote-control toy that looked like the grandfather of Voltron, sold for $5.95. Nov. 19, 1922 "EL CENTRO--With the coming of the ideal weather to Imperial Valley, there is also the annual influx of authors, fictionists, investigators into social stratas and writers of all shades and temperatures, according to those who have watched the comings and goings of these people for several years in the Imperial Valley.

"The valley, while an ideal camping ground for the winter months for those literary inclined, also furnishes some excellent local color for various kinds of novels and short stories due to the very nature of the mixed and conglomerate population and the proximity to the Mexican border where just on the other side the old life of the west still obtains to a great extent; where beers, liquors and wines still flow freely with no fear of Volstead and where unfathomable numbers of police and officers and soldiers go "healed" with large six-guns swinging from belts loaded with cartridges; where the very air is laden with old Spanish romance and custom and where an atmosphere entirely foreign to that of the United States prevails.

"Recently Edwin Brown, nationally known as 'Lodging House Brown' and the 'Millionaire Tramp,' arrived from Denver, saying that he was going to spend most of the winter in Calexico while he worked on another book to be added to others of his authorship, namely, 'The Man Without a Dime' and 'Broke.' Brown is well known all over the country as a sociological worker and author of stories pertaining to the man in hard luck.

"Three or four prominent writers have recently paid visits to the valley to get information of 'color' for some of their work and others have signified their intentions of coming later." From The Times

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