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Job Is Actually a Mutual Relationship

December 01, 1985

Last Sunday's Viewpoints failed to address a critical approach that produces cooperation between apparent adversaries in the business environment.

To address the issue of good relations between management and workers, it is important to stress how to blend business and emotion. One answer is to support the innate personal drive of every man and woman to strive for personal financial freedom. No one likes being subordinated or controlled. That's why management must acknowledge that everyone has the need to control his own life. And workers should constantly pursue options to minimize employer dominance and maximize personal success.

One way millions of workers keep control over their financial futures is to pursue some entrepreneureal effort--with a partner or alone. They're an employee during the day and an owner-operator in the moonlight. Since the beginning of business itself, these cottage industrialists have taken a shot at financial freedom. And many will. In the American economy, the garage is a gateway to greatness.

Fortunately, big business actually supports this entrepreneureal attitude. Big business offers a steady source of income to support workers as they build their own businesses. Big business offers introductions to quality contacts. These contacts are potential partners, customers, backers and suppliers. And business offers training.

The fact is that big business is not an enemy of its workers. Nor is it their family. Big business is an economic environment. A worker's success will depend upon his or her ability to offer a valuable service or product and the ability to develop close interpersonal relationships with peers, seniors and support staff. Ultimately, each of us is a sole proprietor, whether we receive a paycheck from an employer or a client.

LAWRENCE M. KOHN

Los Angeles

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