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POP EYE

January 12, 1986|PATRICK GOLDSTEIN

THE COLOR PINK: Remember the Psychedelic Furs song, "Pretty in Pink," which somehow escaped being a hit several years ago? It may have a second chance, thanks to "Pretty in Pink," a new movie written and executive-produced by John Hughes that takes its name from the song. The movie will be released on Valentine's Day.

The film's sound track, due out in early February on A&M Records, offers a veritable Who's Who of young English artists, including new songs from the Smiths, OMD, New Order and Belouis Some, as well as "Bring on the Dancing Horses," an Echo & the Bunnymen track only available on the group's hits collection and a re-recorded version of the Furs tune. (The record also offers a new Suzanne Vega song, "Left of Center," an INXS track, "Do Whot You Do" and a Jesse Johnson tune, "Get To Know Ya.")

In a classic example of the headaches that accompany the release of an ambitious sound-track project, the label's biggest dilemma is deciding which song to release as the debut single. According to David Anderle, A&M's director of film music, the label is particularly enthusiastic about the OMD track, "If You Leave." Unfortunately, the group already has a new single on the charts ("Secret") and the label is concerned about having the two songs compete with each other for radio attention.

"I think what we'd really like is to have different songs out which would appeal to different radio formats," Anderle said. With that in mind, A&M is working with several rival labels, who have the singles rights to other songs on the sound track. While A&M ponders the release of one of its own singles, Anderle said Warner Bros. Records may release the Echo & the Bunnymen song as a single, while CBS Records is considering re-releasing the Psychedelic Furs title track as a single as well.

"The great thing about this sound track is that it really sounds like a legitimate album, not a compilation," Anderle said. "It holds together so well that you almost get the feeling that it could be all songs by one band, just with a lot of different lead singers."

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