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Motives Questioned

February 09, 1986

Regarding "Arguments in Carbide Case Under Way" (Jan. 4), it's obvious that the prospect of a larger cash settlement, resulting in increased legal fees for American lawyers, is the only consideration in attempting to try the Bhopal case in the United States.

The living conditions in India are appalling by American standards, and the Bhopal victims certainly deserve compensation. However, I don't believe the U.S. court system should be used as an instrument of foreign aid, particularly when a large percentage of any cash settlement would be taken by American lawyers.

The U.S. court system was established to serve the needs of the American people, not to fill the pockets of lawyers. Furthermore, court expenses are paid by the American people. Trying the Bhopal disaster case in the United States would be a misuse of our courts' time and facilities.

Wouldn't it be nice if we had more to offer the world? I find it difficult to respect a person who would even consider taking something from a people who have suffered so much, let alone, traveling halfway around the world seeking such a profit. If the concern of our lawyers is truly for the welfare of those unfortunate Bhopal accident victims, why don't they represent them in India for free?

ROGER A. EVANS

Redondo Beach

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