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The World

February 10, 1986

Canadian work crews began pulling bodies from the smoking wreckage of two trains that collided head-on in western Alberta after a freight failed to allow a passenger train to pass. At least 29 people were confirmed dead. Officials at first estimated the death toll as high as 40, but Dr. Derrick Pounder, a medical examiner, said the count has been reduced. He said that most of the dead appeared to be in one passenger coach that was swept by fire. Pounder said 122 people were believed to have been aboard the two trains.

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