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ARMS : A Trajectory of Talk

March 09, 1986|Thomas Powers | Thomas Powers, whose most recent book is "Thinking About the Next War," is now working on a history of strategic weapons

SOUTH ROYALTON, VT. — Somewhere in Washington a few dozen people at most know whether President Ronald Reagan really wants to reach an agreement with Mikhail S. Gorbachev to get rid of nuclear missiles in Europe. A similar number in Moscow presumably know whether Gorbachev really wants the same thing. Of two things we can be sure: It won't happen unless they really do, and the few dozens who share their confidence will invite no kibitzing in handling the details.

Gorbachev and Reagan have both committed themselves to "getting rid of nuclear weapons," though the professional military men and civilian defense analysts on both sides would be shocked out of their wits to discover that either really expected--or wanted--it to happen. But grant they're serious all the same. In that case what they're really after is hard to explain, hard to defend in public in terms anybody can remember for 10 minutes and very likely just as hard to obtain as "getting rid of nuclear weapons."

Gorbachev began the current round of talks on Jan. 15, with a grand proposal to rid the world of nuclear weapons by the turn of the century, starting with Soviet and U.S. weapons in Europe. Reagan responded by letter Feb. 22, with a three-year proposal to get rid of medium-range missiles--the 441 Soviet SS-20 missiles in Europe and Asia, in exchange for 572 U.S. missiles of two different types currently being deployed in Europe. The Soviets wanted a freeze on new French and British missiles; Reagan said no, let's leave them out of it. The initial Soviet response was something between a sigh and a grumble. There are complications enough in these early exchanges to keep the two sides talking for a year or two, if that's what they want.

But what do they want? Getting rid of nuclear weapons is out of the question. The military men on both sides have lost their capacity to imagine the world without them. They have built their plans around too many warheads, of too many different types, for too many purposes, to go back to scratch. A rough freeze of current types at current levels is militarily possible but politically impossible. Extension of the force levels established by the unratified SALT II Treaty, a renewed commitment to stick with the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty of 1972 and a decision to join the Soviet moratorium on nuclear testing would do the trick nicely and put a roadblock in the way of "Star Wars" deployment as well. But that is not what Reagan wants. What he says he wants is a 50% reduction in strategic systems already deployed--something he might get in exchange for a ban on "Star Wars." But Reagan insists he wants "Star Wars" too. This has all the earmarks of a horse trade in the making, or a serious impasse. The ordinary citizen, having watched one potential horse trade after another come to nothing, may be forgiven for wondering what the horse-traders really want--since it never seems to be the horse at hand.

"This stuff is soporific," said Deputy Defense Secretary Richard N. Perle at a January, 1984, meeting on arms control. "It puts our society to sleep. It does violence to our ability to maintain adequate defenses."

As an official in the Pentagon, Perle has energetically opposed "agreement for agreement's sake"--the temptation to sign some sort of treaty on arms simply because it would be politically popular. Perle's opinion carries weight because he has Caspar W. Weinberger's ear, and no treaty on arms could ever be ratified over the dead body of the secretary of defense. Perle and other officials believe--more or less correctly--that the American public hates thinking about the Soviet Union, defense, big budgets and nuclear weapons. As long as things appear to be working out at the negotiating table, Congress simply won't vote to buy expensive new weapons. A degree of public fear and tension is required. Thus funding for Reagan's strategic arms program since 1981 has depended on failure in Geneva. But now the stage is set for negotiations at a new level of seriousness: Reagan has proved he can get what he wants--"Star Wars," the MX missile, the B-1 bomber, an expanded Navy, neutron bombs and chemical weapons, expensive new intelligence hardware and deployment of new missiles in Europe. The Soviets hate it all and show every sign of genuine willingness to put their own strategic assets on the negotiating table. For the first time in at least a decade, both sides can trade things they have for things they want, if they can only decide what they want.

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