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After 1 1/2 Years, Lisa's Too Used to Living Off the Land

May 13, 1986|JENNINGS PARROTT

--A Littleton, N.H., family sailed into Maine's Boothbay Harbor, completing an around-the-world trip that began in November, 1984, aboard their homemade sailboat. Herb Smith, his wife, Doris, and their two young children were met by an enthusiastic crowd so large that the float at Fishermen's Wharf sank under their weight. The Smiths built their 56-foot sailboat, the Appledore III, in their backyard and the vessel suffered no mechanical breakdowns during the 1 1/2-year voyage. The Smiths and their 9-year-old son, Tommy, had sailed around the world once before, but the trip was a first-time experience for their daughter, Lisa, 5. Smith said Lisa was 3 when the trip started, and he said the boat is the little girl's "security blanket." After stepping ashore at Boothbay Harbor and spending some time on land, Lisa went back aboard the boat, curled up on her bunk and went to sleep.

--Actress Theresa Saldana spends much of her time working on behalf of Victims for Victims--the organization she started after almost being killed by a crazed fan. "You don't have to be a victim to support victims' rights, just as you don't have to be a woman to support women's rights," Saldana said in Spokane, Wash. She said that it is ludicrous that Arthur Jackson--the drifter who tried to kill her by repeatedly stabbing her outside her West Hollywood apartment four years ago, and who has vowed to finish the job--will be paroled in 1988. "I will have no security but what I, or my family, can provide," said Saldana, who has taken a tactical defense course for women that makes her confident she could knock an attacker unconscious in 10 seconds. Jackson developed a "love fixation" for Saldana after seeing her in "Raging Bull." She starred in a television movie about her experience and her organization and also has written a book, "Beyond Survival," that will be published in September.

--Parting is such sweet sorrow, but there was no ducking it at the Dayton, Ohio, Museum of Natural History, said Bob Sexton, museum curator of wild animals. It was time last week for people to return their Rent-a-Ducks. More than 800 incubator-hatched ducklings had been rented to families at Easter to be raised until they were old enough to be released into the wild.

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