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On the Circuit

Sen. Cranston and His Ads: See How They Run

June 04, 1986|MARYLOUISE OATES | Times Staff Writer

In an unprecedented political move, Sen. Alan Cranston begins a media blitz today, the day after the primary to select his GOP opponent. New commercials for Cranston--ads that a campaign insider said "don't ignore his opponent"--were put together Monday at a Hollywood studio under the watchful eye of words-and-media whiz Bob Shrum. The ads were created to cover any contingency--i.e., no matter who won the GOP primary, there would be an ad addressing him or her. The buy is "very substantial," which means that the inveterate jogger Cranston will be running a lot this week in more ways than one. Such an ad blitz has the distinct advantage of setting the stage for the upcoming campaign. And this, just a short five months before the general election.

BOOK REVIEW--Nobody was reading it, just holding it or having Michelle Phillips sign it. But the tea at Trumps that her buddy Sandra Moss gave for the Mama-turned-author Sunday turned out folks like the pregnant Bette Midler, complete with horned-rimmed glasses and her cuddly husband, Martin von Haselberg, a performance artist and photographer. But Midler wasn't interested in reading "California Dreamin'--The Story of the Mamas and Papas." No, she had eyes only for the array of antique watches on the arm of art maven Joan Quinn. "Can I buy one from you? Are you a dealer?" Midler asked, then quickly grabbed Quinn's other arm, which had two large antique bracelets. "Are these faux ?" she asked, then her husband interjected, "That was a faux pas." Very clever repartee for so early in the afternoon. Phillips' dad was there, "always excited about my daughter's success. But you should see the other one. She's the pretty one." Of course, of course. Among the chatters were Audrey Wilder, Louis Jourdan, Tina Sinatra, Coastal Commissioner Mark Nathanson, agent Irving Lazar and Yuki, who does Phillips' hair.

POLI SIGH--In Bev Hills Sunday, one could put politics on toast. Start at the home of Vicki Reynolds for the brunch fund-raiser for Assembly candidate Terry Friedman, hosted by Reynolds and Falcon Communications' Marc and Jane Nathanson. Friedman, who has picked up the endorsement of the National Women's Political Caucus, also picked up money from folks like California Teachers Assn. City Controller Rick Tuttle, showing his grass-roots roots, asked Fay Arfa if she could handle some door-to-door canvassing the day before the election. And you thought the Berman-Waxman people won elections through the mails! . . . On to The Grill, for the birthday brunch and benefit for City Councilman Richard Alatorre. Cathy Moret chaired the $500-a-muncher gathering of mostly downtown business types (like developer Nathan Shapell and the Grand Central Market's Ira Yellin) and politicos Joe Cerrell, Van de Kamp campaign manager Barbara Y. Johnson, Community Redevelopment Agency chair Jim Wood and Donald Livingston. Even Art Snyder--whom Alatorre replaced in a special election last year--was there. Bunker Hill developer Bill Hatch chatted with Sharrell Alatorre and promised "We haven't even scratched the surface yet" on downtown development. Moret said the morning raised $40,000.

LINES OF THE WEEK--Washington political consultant Robert Squier says the now-televised proceedings of the U.S. Senate proves that the august legislative body "is the Not Ready for Prime-Time Players" . . . And, running a close second, was the wonderful line from Rep. William Gray, the Philadelphia Democrat who chairs the House Budget Committee. He was the honored guest at a lunch at Jimmy's Friday, hosted by former Democratic National Chair Chuck Manatt and including a significant number of L.A.'s black elected officials. Also there was the political active Bishop H. Hartford Brookins, to whom Gray addressed his line. "I am a Baptist preacher. I could not become a bishop like Bishop Brookins here, so I decided to run for Congress . . . you think the President has power. You become a bishop and you really have power." Rep. Merv Dymally then rose to tell Gray that "There is no better way to kick off your campaign for the presidency than in California."

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