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A Birthday Party for the Crown City

June 19, 1986|MARY LOU LOPER | Times Staff Writer

Pasadenans don't usually go wild--but today's fine. It's the Crown City's official 100th birthday. On cue, church bells will peal throughout the city at noon today, coinciding with the release of 28,000 balloons. Who knows how many thousands (mothers are corraling even in-laws) will smile for the camera sometime after 12:30 on the City Hall steps. A copy of the giant photo will be placed in the official Centennial time capsule for uncovering in the year 2086.

Dixieland, "Everything's Coming Up Roses," pre-inflation 99-cent lunches of hot dogs, potato chips, soda pop and ice cream--just like an old-fashioned ice-cream social--are on agenda. Mayor John Crowley, Pasadena Centennial coordinating committee chairman John Wood and Centennial Day chairman Carolyn Carlburg will be in the spotlight. Then, tonight, the glorious City Hall will be aglow as Pasadenan Atty. Gen. John Van de Kamp cuts the gigantic birthday cake while a 1,000-member choir sings patriotic songs and newscaster Jess Marlow officiates and the laser show allures. Earlier this week community stalwarts such as Ida Crotty, Raymond and Diane Hester, Ann Lasell and Peggy Phelps celebrated the presentation of Pasadena native Donald Crockett's composition, "The Tenth Muse," commissioned by the city of Pasadena and the Pasadena Chamber Orchestra at a champagne party in the fountain courtyard outside Ambassador Auditorium. Saturday and Sunday, Pasadena is inviting Los Angeles-area neighbors to boogie at the city's Centennial Festival Weekend at Brookside Park as The Code reigns and the winner of the official Pasadena Song Contest is announced amidst a galaxy of hang gliding, cycling, gymnastics, baseball, ethnic dancers, jazz, ragtime, pinatas, American Indian fry bread.

What sets Claremont McKenna College apart from other liberal arts colleges is the emphasis on government and economics, its eight research institutes on campus and the notable success of its college alumni. With only 5,500 graduates in its 40 years, 240 of CMC's alumni are CEOs of major companies. And some of those--Richard Flamson of Security Pacific Corp.; Robert A. Day Jr. of Trust Co. of the West and Robert Lowe of Lowe Enterprises--were among those in the spotlight the other evening with President Jack L. Stark and his wife Jil to reveal that CMC plans to head a capital campaign to raise $50 million for faculty salaries, scholarships and campus facilities. Last year CMC was one of only nine institutions in America to have both Rhodes and Marshall scholars in its graduating class. This year's graduating class includes a Watson fellow and a Truman scholar. U.S. Rep. David T. Dreier (Claremont '75) addressed the audience. A black-tie crowd including Jaclyn and Sydney Rosenberg, Jean Trousdale, Marilyn and Richard Hausman, Marion and John Anderson, Esther and Thomas Wachtell, Ardith and Howard Marguleas, Arden Flamson, Beth Lowe and Marina Day, Bud and Marilyn Schulte and Kevin Riley, listened attentively, and presumably, with financial support intended.

Eli Broad heads the dinner committee for the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce's third Medici Awards Dinner July 11. The black-tie affair will honor selected individuals and businesses for their generous support of the arts. The chamber has chosen the Huntington Library in San Marino for a reception including tours of the library Exhibition Hall and the Virginia Steele Scott Gallery of American Art. Patrons for the evening include David E. Anderson, Roy A. Anderson, Waldo H. Burnside, Lloyd Cotsen, Armand Deutsch, Royce Diener, Raymond D. Edwards, Gerald D. Foster, Joseph W. Harch, Mrs. Harry Lenart, Robert F. Maguire III, Fred W. O'Green, William D. Schulte, Bill White and Phillip L. Williams.

Tea and coffee, sherry and champagne--take your pick--all will be served for the High Tea in Hollywood Gala Celebration Sunday afternoon for the new Frances Howard Goldwyn Hollywood Regional Branch of the Los Angeles Public Library. Local authors are among the first to visit the new branch, designed by architect Frank O. Gehry. Carolyn D. Bennett heads the committee, assisted by Ray Bradbury, Marjorie W. Chen, Carolyn R. Hobbs, Judy M. Horton, Amanda Parsons, Bob Thomas, Irving Wallace and John H. Welborne. Sweeping vistas of quiet reflecting pools and dramatic high ceilings are part of the ambiance to expect.

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