Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCooking

You Asked About . . .

Solving Mystery of Miso

July 03, 1986|JOAN DRAKE | Times Staff Writer

Question: What on earth is miso ? I have looked in the dictionary and numerous cookbooks--hope you have an answer.

Answer: Miso, a common ingredient in Japanese cooking, is fermented bean paste made by boiling soybeans, then mashing them, adding a yeast culture and salt and allowing this mixture to ferment for several months. There are numerous types, but sweet white shiro miso seems to be preferred by Western palates over the red aka miso. In general, the lighter colored miso has a milder flavor than the darker variety. Japanese markets are the best source for miso, but you can also find it at health food stores and in some supermarkets. If stored in an airtight container under refrigeration, it will last almost indefinitely.

Q: What is the best and simplest way to cook a 1 1/2- to two-pound London broil? Broiling or grilling toughens the meat.

A: Broiling and grilling are the methods of cooking recommended by the National Live Stock and Meat Board, but marinating the meat before cooking helps to tenderize this less tender cut of beef. It's also important to use moderate temperatures and not overcook London broil--rare or medium doneness are optimum. Cutting the meat into very thin slices diagonally across the grain will also help to ensure tenderness.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|