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SHORT STORIES

July 13, 1986|PATT MORRISON

Glass Tango The nine-ton slab of glass from an abandoned Pennsylvania factory sits in her Beverly Hills backyard like a new Ice Age, nine feet tall and green as Killarney. In the hands of glass sculptor Suzanne Pascal, it is an 18,000-pound diamond, with a dancing vigor inside that her chisels are setting free. At 72, Pascal is sculpting her oeuvre , and when the seated torso figure is finished, it is to go on exhibition in a cultural exchange with the Soviet Union. She expects to complete work around year's end; by then the piece will have taken nearly a decade of off-and-on work, much of the time spent studying the flow and grain within the slab. Like a phototropic flower, Pascal works "following the light" as it plays on the monolith. Her precision whacks at the irreplaceable piece, which is insured for $3 million, make diamond-cutting look casual. "It's the tour de force of my life; it will always be a major work as far as sculpture, the largest single piece of carved glass in the world." Svelte, No, We Won't Go With a half-ounce letter, you can get a quarter-ton date. Rita Kenny is starting up her Plump Pals dating service on the West Coast, and the former New Jersey blueberry farmer is certain that she can do for the zaftig- plus ladies of the West what she has already done for nearly 1,000 of them back East: create a social life among the avoirdupois set. "Society is just beginning to think of larger women as human beings," says the short, thin woman who was inspired to start Plump Pals by two daughters who once weighed 350 and 234, respectively. "A lot of gentlemen say they have no place to meet a full-figured woman; they don't find them in discos, and if a man approaches a larger woman on the street, they think he's a wacko." Bagging the Quarry California's official state mineral exhibit has a home at last. Booted out of high-rent San Francisco, the 22,000-stone show is open for visitors at the Yosemite Waystation Best Western Motel in Mariposa, a Mother Lode town that won the bidding to provide a home for the rocks. Mariposa wooed the exhibit, which dates to the 1880s, with a promise to provide a home at no taxpayer cost, and the group doing so plans to move the exhibit into a museum within two years. Dial (209) 742-ROCK. Reek Week This is Garlic Week, a Red Cross fund-raiser now in its fourth year, and the events for garlicophiles, like the venerable Lovers of the Stinking Rose Society, begin with tonight's Garlic Alley multi-restaurant cookout in West Hollywood--outdoors, of course. Just follow your nose to San Vicente Boulevard. Pest Wishes Celebrating 30 years of "killing bugs dead," Raid insect spray rolled out its 350-pound, five-foot computerized Roach, formerly named Stella, and its consulting entomologist, still named Ted Granovsky (shown cradling a Madagascar hissing roach). It was a bang-up party at a mid-Wilshire apartment building: cake, balloons and free fumigation, with the Bionic Bug answering queries in English and Spanish.

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