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On the Circuit

Buoyant Weintraub Will Bob Up Again in the Fall

July 18, 1986|MARYLOUISE OATES | Times Staff Writer

Just when you thought it was safe to think he was in deep water, Jerry Weintraub will resurface this fall. The unsinkable former president of United Artists--who produced one of this summer's top box-office hits, "The Karate Kid II"--will stay in the movie biz. And also the record biz. And even the management biz. According to sources, Weintraub has put together a well-financed entertainment company. Details to come in late summer, when he returns from vacationing in Kennebunkport, Me.

OHH, BABY--Bonnie Parker, the very pregnant wife of the "Simon and Simon" star, kept insisting that husband Jameson Parker is so proper in real life that he even wears a tie to bed. OK, maybe not really--but that kind of banter continued through the baby shower given by her two good buddies, Susan Alpert and Colleen O'Rourke, on Wednesday. As custom-made omelets were being turned out, the women--like Joan Kardashian and Patricia McRaney (wife of Parker's TV partner, Gerald McRaney)--just kept talking about babies. The honored mom-to-be, who plans to add Katherine Sullivan Parker to the two-son family next month, said the dad was working on his series so couldn't make the brunch. But Parker did say she had tried to get him there by promising his producer, John Stephens, that she'd have the baby on a weekend. Anything in Hollywood not to disrupt the shooting schedule. . . . Barbara Field showed off her and Ted's latest acquisition Sunday, presenting Chantelle Nicole in her first public appearance. The new mother was so anxious to open one gift that she ripped the card, but laughed, "Chantelle can't read anyway." The shower, at the home of Cameron Ross and her art-dealer husband Lawrence, featured afternoon tea and even an appearance of the new dad. . . . Another Field gift item--he's joined the impressive list of major donors to the Motion Picture and Television Home's $50-million drive. The $500,000 pledge is in the name of his companies, Interscope Communications and Panavision.

HONORED--Camilla Chandler Frost has been named the recipient of the L.A. Arts Council's seventh annual Armand Hammer Award, which is presented for her contributions to the city's cultural life. Currently chairman of the executive committee of the County Museum of Art, Frost has served as museum president and chairman of the board. The award will be presented by Dr. Hammer on Nov. 5 at a luncheon at the Century Plaza.

DRESS FOR A GOOD TIME--That's what the invites say, as Bullock's opens its new downtown store at Seventh Market Place with a party benefiting the new Museum of Contemporary Art. The party, set for Aug. 1, will allow the $100-a-person guests to munch Somerset's hors d'oeuvres (near the pink marble cosmetics counter), have a little lamb curry (in linens), watch fall fashions shown before a just-created backdrop from two L.A. artists, Michele Roberts and Britt Ehringer, and finally, desserts and dancing under the stars. Everybody gets a T-shirt imprinted with the Peter Shire invitation. Both Bullock's and MOCA are hot to attract the younger downtown crowd--and, hey, for $100 a ticket, it's the best benefit buy in town. . . . Also, kudos to Bullock's for its Aug. 3 opening preview benefiting the "Save the Books" campaign for the Los Angeles Central Library.

MORE BENEFITS--Lucasfilm and Universal Pictures will host the world premiere of "Howard the Duck" (with the actual appearance of the Duck still as shrouded as a state secret). It's to benefit the UCLA Film, Television and Radio Archives, and the screening July 30 at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater will be followed by a reception at the Beverly Hilton hotel. (But will the Duck be there?)

AND A SHIPSHAPE BENEFIT--It's Dr. Hammer once again, this time putting his energy behind the Monday $250-a-sailor benefit for the Mary Rose at the Museum of Natural History. It's a nautical theme--with period music, costumes and the Society for Creative Anachronism adding its special touch to the opening of the exhibit from the 400-year-old ship. The Mary Rose, for those of you not too familiar with the history of Tudor ships of war, was sunk in 1545 near Portsmouth, England. After 17 years of effort, half the Mary Rose's hull was raised in 1982. Involved in the salvaging effort: His Royal Highness Prince Charles, a good friend of Dr. Hammer's. In addition to the selected objects from the ship that will go on display is a life-size wax figure of Henry VIII. Party proceeds go to benefit the Mary Rose Trust.

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