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September 26, 1986| Compiled by the Fashion86 staff

Jordache models don't fade away, they become TV stars. Just ask Jack Scalia, whose blue eyes and cleft chin once appeared above a pair of Jordache jeans, not to mention Eminence underwear. This fall he becomes a "casual, hip, '50s-type detective on 'Remington Steele,' " according to George Grimball, menswear manager of Fred Segal, who helped outfit Scalia. His hip attire includes silk shirts, baggy pants and a "Ralph Kramden" jacket. (Yes, folks, that's Ralph Kramden of "The Honeymooners" fame.) Not only did Scalia find clothes for his screen persona, he picked out a few things for real life too. And he caused an uproar among the female employees. "They were dying to meet him," Grimball says. But that pleasure was reserved for Bob Chandler, current talk-show host and former Raiders' football player. After their introduction, Scalia, who once played baseball for the Montreal Expos, threw out a fast one-liner: "Great pair of hands!"

'Family Ties" regular Tina Yothers (she plays Jennifer Keaton on the show) would like to see herself as a fairy princess in real life. So she recently put in a call to Kids in Costume, the children's shop on Melrose Avenue, and asked designer-owner Wanda Fudge to make her the gown to go with the image. Fudge styled a pink-and-turquoise dress with a glitter-covered net skirt. "The whole thing shimmers," she says, adding that Yothers will wear the dress to an upcoming fund-raising dinner and again next spring when she rides on a Mardi Gras parade float. Other fairy princesses, as well as witches, goblins, pumpkins and even a "Fergie" look-alike, will be part of the Halloween costume fashion show Fudge is staging Oct. 19, along with Saks Fifth Avenue, for the Los Angeles Children's Museum. Tickets are available at the museum.

Are you an under-appreciated overachiever? The May Co. wants to know by Saturday. The store is looking for 35 girls, ages 14 to 18, to lavish with gifts and prizes as part of its Young Woman Achievers contest. Top prizes include an internship with NBC's "Today" show and a one-year scholarship to the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising in Los Angeles. But everybody gets a beauty makeover along with a couple of fashion perks. Entry forms are on file at all May Co. stores in the California Juniors department.

If you happen to be on Rodeo Drive the night of Oct. 8, you might notice a three-man team tying up the Hermes shop. Don't call the gendarmes, it's no crime. They're a group of French artistic designers who will be turning the shop into a giant gift box to celebrate the launch of Parfum d'Hermes, the company's newest fragrance for women. The team has brought 650 yards of Hermes red ribbon from France for the occasion, and they've already practiced their performance once by wrapping the Paris Hermes shop when the perfume was launched there. Store spokeswoman Holly Yamron tells Listen they'll be wrapping the Paris shop again soon, to launch a new fragrance for men.

You read it here first, as an unconfirmed report. Now it's official. Listen heard this week from Don Tronstein, chairman of the Rodeo Drive Committee, that a 15,000-square-foot Polo/Ralph Lauren shop will open in February or March on Rodeo Drive, adjacent to Elizabeth Arden and across from the Rodeo Collection. Owned by Beverly Hills menswear magnate Jerry Magnin, the store will include men's, women's and children's clothes and a full complement of Ralph Lauren home furnishings. "It will not be like the New York store," Tronstein says, referring to Lauren's Madison Avenue shop in the old Rhinelander mansion. "That's a one-of-a-kind structure. But the Beverly Hills shop will have the same impact on Rodeo that the New York store has had on Madison--hopefully it will become an institution unto itself."

She's always been a blonde, but could actress Cybill Shepherd be getting a little help these days? The evidence mounts--mostly because she's been named a spokesperson for that "I'm worth it" company, L'Oreal. The star of TV's "Moonlighting" was selected to represent Performing Preference hair color in ads, because, as a L'Oreal spokesperson says, both she and the company represent "natural beauty, glamour," and "the fashion-confident woman of the '80s."

New York fans of Aida Grey, the Beverly Hills beauty maven, no longer have to fly 3,000 miles for skin care (or purchase do-it-yourself products by mail order). Grey recently opened a salon at Manhattan's Bergdorf Goodman. "We were so mobbed," she reports. One of the customers, opera impresario Beverly Sills, was particularly pleased about the location of the salon's latest branch. "She stopped in to see me," Grey says, "and gave me a surprise birthday party."

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