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Roll Call

The House : Defense Bill

October 26, 1986

By a 283-128 vote, the House approved the conference report on the fiscal 1987 Defense Department authorization bill (S 2630). The legislation continues Congress's efforts to slow the growth rate of military spending in deference to the mounting national debt. It sets 1987 Pentagon budget authority at $290 billion, only $4 billion above the comparable 1986 figure and about $30 billion below President Reagan's 1987 request. Actual expenditures, approved by separate legislation, are expected to total $274 billion.

Although House and Senate negotiators brought the budget authority in compliance with the 1987 congressional budget resolution, they used what critics saw as creative bookkeeping to achieve the $290-billion figure. For example, they moved the final military payday of fiscal 1987 into 1988, shifting $2.9 billion in spending to the next fiscal year.

Supporter Les Aspin (D-Wis.) said the measure "is probably a very good bill."

Opponent John Edward Porter (R-Ill.) said, "Someday we are going to have to understand that a sound economy is just as important to our national security as a strong military."

Members voting yes supported the bill.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Dreier (R) x Rep. Martinez (D) x Rep. Moorhead (R) x Rep. Roybal (D) x Rep. Torres (D) x

Immigration Reform

By a 238-173 vote, the House approved the conference report on a bill that attempts to stem the flow of illegal aliens into this country while safeguarding the rights of the millions of foreigners now living here illegally. The immigration reform measure (HR 3810) is considered landmark legislation because it addresses one of the nation's most pressing problems and ends years of congressional gridlock over the issue.

The bill grants legal residency and a chance at citizenship to illegal aliens who entered America before 1982 and to undocumented immigrants who worked in American agriculture for at least 90 days in the year ending May 1, 1986.

To remove the economic incentive behind most illegal immigration, the bill imposes civil and criminal penalties against employers who knowingly hire undocumented workers.

Supporter Bill McCollum (R-Fla.) said the bill's amnesty section was too generous but he would "hold my nose and vote for this conference report" because it combats "the invasion that's occurring across our land borders."

Opponent Edward R. Roybal (D-Los Angeles) denounced the bill as discriminatory to Hispanics and "designed to provide cheap labor for the farmers and growers of this country."

Members voting yes supported the immigration bill.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Dreier (R) x Rep. Martinez (D) x Rep. Moorhead (R) x Rep. Roybal (D) x Rep. Torres (D) x

Legalization of Aliens

By a 192-199 vote, the House rejected an amendment eliminating a section of the immigration reform bill (above) that legalizes the residency of illegal aliens who entered this country before 1982 and have lived here continuously. These individuals are estimated to number several million. After receiving amnesty, they would have to wait six years before seeking citizenship.

Amendment supporter Joe L. Barton (R-Tex.) said amnesty would "legitimize millions of unconvicted criminals (and) reward them with the most treasured thing a human being on the face of this globe could have . . . the path toward citizenship of the U.S.A."

Opponent Hamilton Fish Jr. (R-N.Y.) said the amnesty section "will permit this population to come out of the shadows and contribute more to our country."

Members voting yes wanted to eliminate the amnesty section of the immigration bill.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Dreier (R) x Rep. Martinez (D) x Rep. Moorhead (R) x Rep. Roybal (D) x Rep. Torres (D) x

Appropriations Bill

By a 235-172 vote, the House approved the conference report on a record-breaking $576-billion appropriations bill (HJ Res 738) that will fund most government functions in fiscal 1987. Among its thousands of provisions is a 3% pay hike next January for members of Congress and other U.S. civilian and military workers.

The Senate also approved the legislation, making it the most expensive single measure ever approved by Congress. Still, with only a 1% hike over 1986 levels, it represented the lowest annual growth rate in federal spending during the Reagan administrations.

Funding the government once again by means of a low-accountability, jam-packed "continuing resolution" became necessary when Congress, despite being in session since January, failed to clear any of the 13 regular appropriations bill for fiscal 1987.

Members voting yes supported the $576-billion funding measure.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Dreier (R) x Rep. Martinez (D) x Rep. Moorhead (R) x Rep. Roybal (D) x Rep. Torres (D) x

'Buy America'

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