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GARDEN JOBS

Wrapping It Up

November 09, 1986|GEORGE HARMON SCOTT and BILL SIDNAM

Transplants of cauliflower do well when planted this month. The variety 'Early Snowball A' produces especially well in the Southland and is favored by many commercial growers. The flavor of cauliflower is better if, after the heads begin to form, the outer leaves are tied up over them. Direct exposure to sunlight turns the heads yellow and strengthens the flavor, but it also gives them a higher vitamin content. Although purple cauliflower is available only as seed, it has the advantage of being more nutritious than the conventional type and has an flavor that resembles that of regular cauliflower blended with a sweet, mild broccoli. 'Purple Head' is a good variety.

Sasanqua camellias can be found in bloom in the nurseries now. That name often leads gardeners to expect large, glamorous flowers like those of Camellia japonica , but the two should not be compared. They bloom at different times, and each is beautiful in its own way, sasanqua camellia blooms being about half the size of Camellia japonica --but plentiful. The colors range from white to pink to red; some are double and some single with yellow stamens. The foliage is much smaller, and the stems are often willowy, which makes them easy to espalier. Many varieties have been used as ground covers; others are quite upright in habit. Sasanquas are much better adapted to sun than the Camellia japonica.

In fire-hazard areas, keep plantings away from the walls of houses. Exceptions might be green lawns, ivy, ice plant and sea fig, because they are low growers and not highly flammable. There are great differences in the fire resistance of plants (some of the California natives that adapt to drought are the worst). For more information, consult the the Los Angeles State and County Arboretum, in Arcadia.

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