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Soviet Dissident's Cancer-Stricken Wife Reportedly to Be Allowed to Emigrate

December 21, 1986|From Times Wire Services

MOSCOW — Soviet dissident Nahum Meiman said Saturday that officials have indicated that they no longer object to his cancer-stricken wife's emigrating. But, he said, they have not told him if he will be allowed to accompany her.

Meiman, 75, said Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze told visiting U.S. Sen. Gary Hart last week that authorities had no objection to the emigration of his wife, Inna Kitrosskaya, 53.

Regarding Meiman's case, however, Shevardnadze reportedly told the Colorado Democrat only that authorities would reconsider his application to leave.

In Washington, Hart said Saturday he told Kitrosskaya that she would be allowed to leave but that, according to Shevardnadze, the issue of allowing Meiman to emigrate will be given further study.

In previously refusing Kitrosskaya's application to emigrate, officials cited Meiman's theoretical work for a physics institute in the mid-1950s, saying he knows state secrets and could have divulged them to his wife.

Meanwhile, another cancer patient whose request to travel to the United States for treatment was granted by the Soviet Union after more than seven years has arrived in New York.

Rimma Bravve, who arrived Friday with her husband, Vladimir, was greeted by her mother, Khanna Anbinder, a former pediatrician. Her sister, Larisa Shapiro, who emigrated a decade ago, had met her in Vienna.

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