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January 16, 1987| Compiled by the Fashion87 staff

Aid against AIDS: It's hoped that thousands in the L.A. fashion industry will join together at the Century Plaza Hotel Feb. 6 to show solidarity in the fight against AIDS. "We plan a memorable evening," says May Co. Vice President Jim Watterson, who's on the committee of Fashion Industry Friends of AIDS Project L.A., the group sponsoring the dinner event. Watterson is also producing the fashion show segment of the evening, which ought to be a doozy. It will feature 140 originals by the late Hollywood designer and costumer Adrian, known as "the father of the American silhouette." Adrian's on-film gowns for Greta Garbo, Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford, Rosalind Russell, Greer Garson, Jeanette MacDonald and many others literally shaped the look of American women's clothes during his era, Watterson says. And his "coat-hanger silhouette" with its broad shoulders, slim skirt and architecturally detailed jacket dominated American fashion from 1942 to 1946, Watterson adds. The clothes are being lent from a private collection for this one-time-only showing. The evening's finale will be a parade of up to 150 contemporary Los Angeles designers, each of whom will offer, at a silent auction, a sweat shirt outfit specially designed for the cause. That's just part of the evening's agenda. Tickets are $200 per person, with proceeds to Aids Project Los Angeles, a nonprofit organization. For reservations, call the APLA office at (213) 738-8200.

Brigitte Nielsen stopped by the Azzedine Alaia shop before the sale, to stock up on a few fashion necessities. She left with four pairs of skintight wool ski pants in different colors, an ecru-color duster coat and dress and a long dress with a hood, Listen hears from Jessica Uribe of the Rodeo Drive shop. Uribe adds that Neilsen sent the costumers for "Beverly Hills Cop II"--now being filmed around town--into the store too. They picked out one of Alaia's black dresses for Nielsen to wear in one scene in the movie.

To each her own. That's skin-care specialist Ole Henriksen's latest modus operandi. It all started, he tells Listen, with Joan Van Ark of "Knots Landing." She convinced Henriksen to turn a cream he uses for treatments at his Sunset Boulevard salon into one she could take home. He obliged Van Ark and her "sensitive, porcelain complexion" with a special formula that is filled with botanical extracts like primrose oil, frankincense, lavender, Bulgarian rose, chamomile, comfrey and geranium oil. Word spread, and the next thing Henriksen knew, demand for his made-to-order formulas were coming from Liza Minelli, Eva Gabor, Judith Light, Barbara Bel Geddes and Alfre Woodard. Each now has a special concoction containing about eight plant extracts. Henriksen says primrose oil reduces moisture loss, improves circulation and makes the skin supple. Frankincense calms facial tension and helps preserve a youthful complexion. Lavender is no slouch either: It is "detoxifying, rejuvenating and nourishing." Who said you should be promised a rose garden?

Who's hot in menswear?The California Mart just came out with its list of nominees for the annual Marty Awards, which honor top West Coast menswear designers. This year's list singles out both familiar and fledgling firms. Among them: Martin Weening and John Leitch for Axis, Mel and Kerry Matsui for Code Blue, Jeff Hamilton for Jeff Hamilton, and Michael Tomson for Gotcha. The youngsters on the list are Ben and Sandra Serebreni, for 1-year-old Hoopla by Michael Antara, and Carl Jones for the even younger Surf Fetish. Members of the menswear industry and fashion press are voting on the winner, who will be announced Jan. 26.

Attention, Scarsdale and Beverly Hills diets, we have a new one for the road. The book is "The Dr. DeBetz Champagne Diet," subtitled "The Medically Proven Program for Total Weight Control." With the book's debut scheduled for Valentine's Day, DeBetz and co-author Samm Sinclair Baker will certainly have something to celebrate. Of course, you don't get to drink all that much: just a three-ounce glass of dry champagne, dry sparkling wine or any dry white or red wine mixed with salt-free seltzer or club soda at dinner each night. However, on this diet you don't count calories, and you're offered the possibility of losing five pounds or more per week. The sweet secret of success is said to be in DeBetz's "STOPlines" and "SUPPORTlines." For example, when the desire to dive into a gorgeous piece of chocolate cake strikes, you practice a 20-second think-again procedure that involves touching your face and repeating three phrases: "For my body, overeating is an insult and a poison. I need my body to live. I owe my body this respect and attention." And just in case it works, here's a toast to the new you.

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