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Death of Young Graffiti Artist

January 18, 1987

Reading about the tragic death of Bored to Death member Timothy Sanders (Jan. 2) nearly broke my heart as a mother and teacher.

It is particularly frightening to me, too, that he was such a spokesman for the growing population of miserable youngsters who seem to have so little direction in life. This new group, this Bored Generation, seems to be so negative and so restless that it is apparently undermining the very fabric of our current society. I see these kids everywhere--on TV, in the classroom, on the streets--wandering without direction, pushing harder and harder to find the violent new experience or the ultimate thrill.

It's hard to accept this obsessive joy-seeking. Do all of these bored-to-death young people see nothing but a gaping void if they aren't doped, drunk or blasted out of their minds? If so, then they had better move over for some young people who look at the world quite differently!

Our schools, colleges and universities are filled with a new group of young people who are not looking just for "action." They're serious about their quests for knowledge, skills and success. These are the immigrants--from Asia, the Middle East, Latin America--who see beyond the plastic world of television, drugs and fast living. It seems to me that the bored-to-deaths are going to have to step out of the way of the serious students, to make way for the astute business people, the goal-oriented wonders marching into the world of success on their motivation, persistence and skills used to the greatest advantage.

The future may look bleak for the average Orange County teen-ager, and the area may seem to be devoid of "fun." But for others, the opportunities are here, and they are taking advantage of every open door to their own success.

My sympathies go out to the parents and friends of all of the young people who are so extremely restless or bored, and particularly to the ones who have lost their youngsters so tragically. I hope we are alert to the lessons, to the cries for help, to the waste of talents we see in such incomprehensibly sad situations. And I hope we are ready to step aside for the young who will not let boredom and thrill-seeking stand in the way to success.

NANCY J. ILLO

Santa Ana

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