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GARDEN JOBS

Clivia Seeds

March 08, 1987|GEORGE HARMON SCOTT and BILL SIDNAM

Clivias are in bloom now, and if you allowed last year's colorful pods to remain on the plant, it's time to plant the seeds. The pods' shelf life is short, so be sure to plant soon after picking. There are usually four seeds in each pod. Fold them inside a damp paper towel, place the towel in a small plastic bag and seal the bag. It takes about a month for them to get started and three years for plants to bloom. In seed catalogues, the price of clivia seeds has gone up to about $1.20 per seed.

Fertilizer will do more good now than at any other time of the year. It is the beginning of the growing season, and if nutrients are present, plants will use them. Look at citrus and gardenias for signs of chlorosis (the leaves will be pale yellow). That may be due to a lack of nitrogen, but it also can be a sign of iron deficiency. Rye lawns that look a little tired can be pepped up with fertilizer.

'Early Girl' tomato plants will produce fruit under colder temperature conditions than will most other varieties. If you plant soon, you may have ripe fruit by early May.

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