Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFixme

Newsmakers

Toward Cherry He's Cordial but He'll Razz a Berry

April 13, 1987|SHIRLEY MARLOW

Chester Janick has had more than a taste of success in his long career. Janick, of Aurora, Ill., estimates he has eaten more than 11,000 pints of ice cream on the job--mostly in tablespoon-size bites--and has tried more than 200 flavors, including many he created himself, as a professional ice cream sampler. Some flavors never made it past the testing stage. "There was the chocolate-pineapple," he recalled. "We tried it about 20 years ago, and it just didn't work. Those two flavors don't work out together." But people scooped up many of his other flavors, such as razzmatazzberry, ivory chocolate and cherry cordial. Janick, 63, has some advice for amateur ice cream tasters: Because of the effect of freezing on ingredients, "people should eat their ice cream when it's just beginning to melt." Janick, who began his career in 1943, can't seem to get his fill on the job. "I also eat ice cream at home. Usually with toppings and a couple of times a week."

--Even though Denver seems to have plenty of room for the buffalo to roam--13,000 acres of mountain parkland in Jefferson and Douglas counties--city officials want to reduce their herds. So, bison buyers will have a chance to bid Thursday when 25 yearlings go on the block to keep the city's two-herd total to a manageable 50 head, Denver Mountain Park officials said. Park foreman Lee Gylling said buffaloes brought an average price of $450 at last year's auction.

--Almost 75 years after an orchestra on the deck of the Titanic played "Nearer My God to Thee" as the great ship sank, nine survivors of the disaster listened again to the hymn during a memorial service in Wilmington, Del. The Titanic Historical Society re-enacted the interdenominational service held on the Sunday the ship hit an iceberg--April 14, 1912. More than 1,500 people died when the ship sank. According to the society, about 24 of the 700 survivors still live. "If there's anything the Titanic teaches us, (it) is (that) nothing is guaranteed and to think so is to flirt with death," said the Rev. George Wilson of Houston, who led the service. The service ended the society's first convention since the Titanic's final resting place was found and photographed. Robert D. Ballard, who headed the joint U.S.-French 1985 expedition that discovered the wreck, appeared at the convention.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|