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DAMNING THE YANQUI

May 03, 1987

Walker was an aberration of United States history in general and never an official representative of American foreign policy in particular. In fact, it was U.S. Naval officers that prevented his second attempt to seize Nicaragua in 1857 by arresting him.

But just as Walker flouted U.S. law and policy, so has the writer contrived an article that is replete with pro-Sandinista overtones.

It is not surprising that Nicaragua's government is hospitable to Americans making a film with a blatantly anti-American theme.

It is also unfortunate that the freedom of expression in film and music that cannot thrive in a totalitarian nation will gradually be stifled in Nicaragua as the Western World idly watches. If we're going to be searching for historical parallels in this geopolitical mess, let's look at the history of oppression in Nicaragua's supporters: Cuba and the Soviet Union.

Actor Joe Strummer's former band "The Clash" couldn't get away with "Know Your Rights" in those countries. But please, regardless of our political views, let's be reasonable and be critical of all non-democratic nations. I really wonder how sanguine writer Goldstein would have been if the film were being made in Pinochet's right-wing Chilean dictatorship instead of Ortega's left-wing Nicaraguan dictatorship.

DAVID L. CORRICK

Mather AFB

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