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Roll Call

The House

May 24, 1987

National Debt

The House voted 296 to 124 to extend the current national debt ceiling of $2.32 trillion until July 17 so the government can issue securities, pay its bills and stay out of default. The measure (HR 2360) was sent to the Senate, where it also was approved.

Supporter Robert H. Michel (R-Ill.) said the borrowing authority is needed "to keep our government financially afloat."

Opponent Arthur Ravenel (R-S.C.), a freshman, said, "I just got here. I did not make this mess, and I am not going to vote for any extensions of the debt ceiling."

Members voting yes wanted to extend the debt ceiling.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Anderson (D) x Rep. Dixon (D) x Rep. Dymally (D) x Rep. Gallegly (R) x Rep. Levine (D) x Rep. Lungren (R) x

'Star Wars' Funding

The House voted 219 to 199 to lower missile-defense research and development funding in fiscal 1988 to $3.1 billion, $420 million under this year's level and far below the $5.7 billion requested by the Reagan Administration for its Strategic Defense Initiative or "Star Wars."

The allocation is part of the $289-billion 1988 defense authorization bill (HR 1748) that remains under debate pending votes on dozens of amendments. Final spending authority will be set later in a House-Senate conference.

Supporters of the cut said it sets the stage for a compromise with the Senate that will result in 1988 "Star Wars" spending at about this year's level.

Opponent John R. Kasich (R-Ohio) said the move "mortally wounds the entire SDI program."

Members voting yes favored less "Star Wars" spending.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Anderson (D) x Rep. Dixon (D) x Rep. Dymally (D) x Rep. Gallegly (R) x Rep. Levine (D) x Rep. Lungren (R) x

MX Missile

By a vote of 184 for and 239 against, the House failed to block the basing of MX nuclear missiles on special railroad trains. The vote rejected an amendment to the defense authorization bill (above) to delete the $250 million allocated for the rail project in fiscal 1988.

The trains are to be kept on military bases except during crises, when they would be dispersed to be made less vulnerable to attack. The MX, the most powerful U. S. weapon, now is deployed in hardened silos.

Dennis M. Hertel (D-Mich.), a supporter of blocking the mobile MX, said rail basing is "the back door to having additional MX missiles."

Opponent William L. Dickinson (R-Ala.) called the amendment "a thinly veiled attempt to kill the MX."

Members voting yes opposed putting the MX on rails.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Anderson (D) x Rep. Dixon (D) x Rep. Dymally (D) x Rep. Gallegly (R) x Rep. Levine (D) x Rep. Lungren (R) x

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