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UCSD-Community College Pact Is a Blessing for Many

July 12, 1987

The recent agreement between UC San Diego and the San Diego Community College District to smooth the transfer of community college students into the university promises to be a program that will benefit students, parents and both institutions.

Under the agreement, students whose course work and grade point averages meet UCSD's requirements for freshmen and sophomores will be guaranteed admission to the university. Officials expect about 300 students a year to take advantage of the program.

A similar agreement between UC Davis and Los Rios Community College District in Sacramento has won high marks from both of those institutions. Among the benefits UC Davis officials cite are a better understanding on the part of students about what is required to get into the university, enhanced cooperation between the academic departments so that the courses are in sync and a reduction in the anxiety some students feel while wondering whether they will be accepted at UC Davis.

Under California's Master Plan for Higher Education, community college students already have priority in transferring to schools in the UC or California State systems. But a plan such as this helps students who begin their college careers in community colleges to focus on what they must accomplish if they wish to transfer to UCSD. It also can be a major financial blessing for parents or students who must pay for their own educations. Community college fees are only $50 a semester.

Additionally, having UCSD as senior partner could be a positive influence on the community colleges. At UC Davis, some departments have developed close relationships with their counterparts in the community colleges, and some exchange of teaching personnel has occurred.

Finally, we believe the new ties with Mesa, Miramar and San Diego City colleges will be good for UCSD, which sometimes seems isolated from the larger community.

The pact makes sense for everyone concerned. Now it's up to both institutions to actually make it work as it is intended.

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