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Santa Monica Unveils Plans to Develop Sfite on Beachfront

July 23, 1987|ALAN CITRON | Times Staff Writer

The City of Santa Monica, after months of discussions, this week unveiled a series of proposals made by private companies hoping to develop a piece of prime beachfront property.

Nine firms want to build a luxury hotel on the five-acre site now occupied by the Sand and Sea Club, 415 Pacific Coast Highway. Another developer is seeking permission to build a restaurant on the property. There is also a proposal to preserve the site for the aging Sand and Sea Club.

City Hall sources say it is unlikely that anything other than a hotel will be allowed on the property, which is owned by the state and managed by the city, but one official said all of the proposals will receive equal consideration.

'Very Pleased'

"We are very pleased with the number of plans that we received," said Assistant City Manager Lynne C. Barrette. "All of the proposals showed a great deal of thought and we will look at all of them as serious proposals."

The beachfront property, located on Santa Monica's legendary Gold Coast and once owned by actress Marion Davies, has been held by the state since 1956 and operated as a private or semiprivate club since 1962.

By redeveloping the property, officials hope to bring in more revenue and improve public accessibility to the beach. Barrette said that the city is demanding a minimum of $500,000 a year in rent, contrasted with the $120,000 it now receives from the club.

City staff members will study all 11 proposals and will meet with selected developers during coming months. A final decision is expected within four months.

The nine hotel plans look strikingly similar on paper, though Barrette said that each has unique architectural features. The city is looking for a style of development that blends in with the area. Developers are also expected to provide easy access to the site and plenty of parking, Barrette said.

American Realcorp, headed by Robert Cohen, proposed building a 154-room all-suite hotel on the site. The company's plans also call for a restaurant, public recreation and beach-oriented facilities along with 611 parking spaces.

Badt/Kimpton Associates, a company that includes current Sand and Sea Club manager Douglas Badt, has submitted plans for a 131-room inn with restaurants, public recreation and beach-oriented facilities, a community center and 625 parking spaces.

Entrada Associates wants to build a 198-room inn on the site. Their project also would include restaurants, public recreation and beach-oriented facilities, a cultural center and 606 parking spaces.

The Four Fifteen Development Partnership submitted plans for a 216-room hotel with restaurants and public recreation and beach-oriented facilities. It would include 685 parking spaces.

The 415 PCH Group hopes to build a 250-room hotel with a community center, restaurants, public recreation and beach-oriented facilities and 680 parking spaces.

Raleigh/Executive Life Insurance Co. submitted plans for a 162-room hotel. The development also would include restaurants, public recreation and beach-oriented facilities, an arts center and 444 parking spaces.

The Santa Monica Beach Development Partnership, a company headed by Santa Monica restaurateur Michael McCarty, proposed a 148-room hotel with restaurants, public recreation and beach-oriented facilities, an art and environment center and 500 parking spaces.

Westgroup Inc. proposed a 175-room hotel with restaurants, public recreation and beach-oriented facilities and 380 parking spaces.

Caravel Hotel Management has submitted plans for a 250-room hotel with restaurants, public recreation and beach-oriented facilities and 1,000 parking places.

The restaurant proposal was submitted by Bryant L. Morris and Robert J. Morris, owners of Gladstone For Fish in Pacific Palisades and other restaurants.

The proposal for preserving the Sand and Sea Club was made by the Santa Monica Beach Preservation Assn., a group composed of about 200 club members who hope to preserve the facility by convincing officials that they can make the club more accessible to the public.

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