Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

'A New Soviet Union'

August 11, 1987

I disagree with some of the conclusions of Cox and I am not so sure that, except for an end to the arms race and an end to the possibility of nuclear war, I wish Gorbachev to survive and to succeed.

If democracy comes to the Soviet Union, there is no real reason to believe that it will cease to attempt to expand its influence throughout other parts of the globe. Indeed, much of the world (particularly the Muslim countries) which views the Soviet Union with suspicion on the basis of its goal of subverting the rest of us to communism may now very well perceive a democratic Soviet Union as less a threat or as no threat and welcome its friendship and its support.

The United States, which has been a democracy for over 200 years, has been and still is attempting to exert its influence worldwide--if for no other reason than to contain its military, economic and political enemies. What will there be to complain about, for example, if a democratic Soviet Union is accepted in the developing countries of Africa and Latin America, or anywhere else?

The most sinister and long-term effects, however, lie in a Russia turned capitalistic (an inevitable result of the evolution to democracy). Imagine the people of a country which includes one-fifth of the earth's land mass and with enormous natural resources, until now unable to use their creative energy, suddenly set free to be the masters of their own destiny and to taste the pleasures and rewards of modern society. Notwithstanding that they were kept in bondage under the czars and the repressive yoke of Marxism for so long, the Russian people have still managed to contribute much to the world in science, literature, music and other fields of human endeavor--nor are they even now totally without technical knowledge and an industrial capacity. When their chains are finally cut, watch out America!

SHERMAN B. LANS

Beverly Hills

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|