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Respect at Work

September 13, 1987

In support of Harry Bernstein's July 28 column, "Sweat Shop Abuses in the High-Tech Age":

I work in reservations for an airline, a position where I have been monitored at least twice a month for four years. As my industry has become more deregulated, the pressure on all employees (management included) has been increasing. However, I feel that when management under pressure uses computer monitoring, it simply transfers that stress to its employees. How can that be productive?

My performance has been rated consistently above average or outstanding. I have never been advised to undergo any corrective training to become a better worker. Computer monitoring has not been useful to me or my clients. It only allows an uninvited party to listen in to a private conversation. Perhaps my supervisor is learning from me how the job should be done.

If I cannot be trained and trusted to do my job, then I should be removed from that position. Instead of using costly monitoring tools, today's management should try using inexpensive respect and trust to get higher productivity from satisfied workers.

CHARLES PROFIT

Hollywood

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