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Racism in the Body Politic

September 13, 1987

Regarding "Glendale Jurist Stunned by His Fall From Grace" by David DeVoss, Aug. 31: Glendale Municipal Court Commissioner Daniel Calabro may be encouraged by the more than 100 letters he has received in support, but I'm not. In fact, I am utterly amazed that there are 100 people walking around in this day and age who still don't recognize a bigoted remark when they hear one.

If 100 people can't accept the fact that the word nigger is a racist slur of the highest order, then what does that say for the country? Does this mean that an entire generation has grown up since the civil rights and equal opportunity struggles of the last two decades insensitive to the feelings of blacks?

If so, we need to call those who are willing to apologize for bigotry exactly what they are--racists. They must understand that a slip of the tongue or off-the-cuff remark by a public official that slanders blacks or any other ethnic group is neither funny nor harmless.

I'm sure Judge Calabro is a good family man, an honest, hard-working jurist and probably in his own way a man of integrity. This is precisely what compounds the tragedy. Racism is so deeply ingrained in the body politic of the country that it can affect individuals without their being consciously aware of it.

EARL HUTCHINSON

Inglewood

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