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COMMUNITY PROFILE

Westminster

November 07, 1987

City Services

City Hall (714) 898-3311

8200 Westminster Ave.

Police (business) (714) 898-3311

8200 Westminster Ave.

Fire (business) (714) 893-0571

7351 Westminster Ave.

Post Office (714) 893-0566

13761 Golden West St.

In Emergency, Dial 911

Government

City Council: Elden F. Gillespie (mayor), Joy L. Neugebauer (mayor pro tem),Frank Fry, Charles V. Smith, Anita Huseth

City Manager: Robert Huntley (interim)

Fire Chief: D'Wayne Scott

Chief of Police: Saviers Donald

Statistics

Population: (1986 estimate) 73,954

Area: 10.7 square miles

Incorporation: March 27, 1957

Median household income: $31,182

Median home value: $95,341

Racial/ethnic mix: white, 84.2%; Latino, 13.8%; black, 0.9%; other, 14.9%

(Total is more than 100% because racial/ethnic breakdowns overlap)

Employment status

Employed persons: 34,343

Unemployed: 1,564

Not in labor force: 17,373

Per capita income: $8,450

Education

Adults over 25

Years of school completed:

0-11 years: 23.1%

12 years: 36.8%

13-15 years: 24.6%

16+ years: 15.5%

Median years completed: 12.7

Median Age: 31.5 years

Statistics: Donnelley Demographics

FOCUS A Changing City In 1968, when Westminster dedicated its new civic center, city planners chose to build the new Tudor-style complex around a landmark Big Ben-style clock. It was hoped according to news reports at the time , that such traditional British trappings would inspire similar architecture throughout the city. But 20 years later, there is a different influence in architecture--distinctly Asian. Since the fall of Saigon in 1975, thousands of Vietnamese immigrants have settled in the city, which is now home to the largest Vietnamese population outside Vietnam. Asians now make up 15% of the city's population. Asian businesses have concentrated along Bolsa Avenue in an area now known as Little Saigon. In March, business leaders announced a $30-million Asiantown project at the corners of Bolsa Avenue and Bushard Street that is intended to be a cultural and commercial magnet for Southeast Asians.

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