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IRS Above Law

November 22, 1987

In Debra Whitefield's "Money Talk" column of Oct. 17, the comments pertaining to the Internal Revenue Service put fear into the heart of this taxpaying senior citizen.

The article states the IRS gives all sorts of advice to taxpayers, but that not all of it can be relied upon. If you follow the advice and get audited, the IRS cannot be held accountable. Nor is a taxpayer relieved from paying any interest or penalties due to incorrect information given by the agency. Each year when the IRS sends its booklet to taxpayers, telephone numbers are listed for taxpayers who want to call for assistance. I don't need help to come up with the wrong answers.

The IRS recognizes that the average citizen isn't current on new legislation or court decisions. The only recourse we have is to hire a tax professional and hope he or she stays on top of everything.

The IRS takes the position that the taxpayer is guilty of cheating until proved innocent. How can this be defended? The real questions to consider deal with how the IRS got its powers and how the agency is policed.

AMY TOWNSEND

Whittier

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