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Is Destroying a Computer a 'Peaceful' Activity?

November 22, 1987

The front page of the View section on Nov. 11 reads, "Why a Berkeley MBA Trashed a Multimillion-Dollar Air Force Computer in the Name of Peace." Kathleen Hendrix's article tells us of Katya Komisaruk's antics. Among Komisaruk's "peaceful" activities were the wanton destruction of government property, specifically an Air Force defense computer at Vandenberg Air Force Base. Her self-declared justification for doing so was that she "believed the facility was operational and . . . provides the United States with a 'first strike' capability. . . ."

Let's assume that Komisaruk, in her infinite wisdom and knowledge, had been correct (which she was not) and indeed the facility had been operational. . . . Because the article made no mention of degrees in advanced circuitry while discussing her education, one must assume that she had none. Therefore, she could not have known what results her actions might have had.

Sorrowfully, the Los Angeles Times chose to glorify her actions by telling how, "in the name of peace," this individual "danced on computer chips" that she had destroyed. It went on to describe how after the "peaceful" deed had been done, she left a bouquet of flowers, a box of cookies and a poem ending with the instructions "No cheap shots."

The "shot" that I am now taking is on behalf of the American people who must now bear the cost of what Komisaruk's actions have wrought. What she has succeeded in doing has had absolutely no effectiveness in promoting peace.

ADAM FEIN

Beverly Hills

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