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Human Test OKd for 2nd AIDS Vaccine

November 26, 1987|Associated Press

WASHINGTON — A second experimental vaccine that researchers hope can prevent AIDS virus infections was approved for human testing Wednesday by the Food and Drug Administration.

The new vaccine was developed by Bristol-Myers Co. of New York City. It is made from vaccinia virus, from which smallpox vaccine has been manufactured. Genes from the surface, or protein envelope, of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome virus are injected into the vaccinia virus by using recombinant DNA techniques.

Although the proteins themselves are not infectious, researchers believe they may stimulate the body to produce antibodies effective against AIDS.

The vaccine will be tested in 30 to 60 homosexual volunteers who are not infected with the AIDS virus, officials said. A control group will receive smallpox vaccine.

FDA Commissioner Frank E. Young emphasized that the vaccine is in the earliest phase of clinical tests.

The first potential AIDS vaccine approved for human testing was developed by Microgenesys Inc. of West Haven, Conn. The vaccine, approved for testing on Aug. 18, is cultured from an insect cell.

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