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POP EYE

November 29, 1987|PATRICK GOLDSTEIN

HOT FLASHES: You won't be seeing Motley Crue's new video on MTV next week nor anytime soon. The 24-hour video channel, which was roundly criticized in some quarters for airing the Crue's last clip (which was set in a strip club), has nixed "You're All I Need," the band's video based on a news item about a love-crazed teen-age boy who murdered his girlfriend. The clip shows the girl's corpse being zipped into a body bag and the boy being handcuffed and led away by police.

"We feel the video is excessively violent and disturbing, both visually and lyrically," an MTV spokeswoman said. "As it stands now, we haven't suggested any edits or trims. We simply have no plans to air the video."

From his Los Angeles office, Crue manager Doug Thaler said: "If we thought it was a video that would leave negative impressions on younger viewers, I don't think we would have made it. But MTV has their own standards and practices department and it's their channel and they have to program what they feel is appropriate.

"I don't agree with them. I think it breaks new ground. I think it's a powerful, moving piece, and I don't think it in any way glamorizes what the song is about. . . . The message here is very, very clear that if you do something like this, you ruin a lot of lives, but you definitely ruin your own."

Thaler, who said guitarist Nikki Sixx wrote the song during a tour after reading a newspaper account of a teen killing, said he has no animosity toward MTV. But he admitted that the decision surprised him, especially after the band offered to cut any offending frames.

"But they didn't feel that (the situation would be resolved) even if we softened it. The problem was the lyrical content of the song."

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