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Inmates Who Held 28 Hostages at Elba Prison Get Long Terms

December 06, 1987|United Press International

LEGHORN, Italy — Six long-term prison inmates who held 28 hostages for eight days on the vacation island of Elba in August in Italy's longest jail siege have drawn jail terms ranging from 12 years to 14 years.

The siege started Aug. 25, at the height of the tourist season, in the model prison at Porto Azzurro on the island of Elba, famous as the exile home of Napoleon.

Six inmates led by former neo-fascist terrorist leader Mario Tuti, 40, seized the prison director and other hostages and barricaded themselves in the infirmary on the top floor of the island jail.

All the rebels were serving life terms for murder and other crimes.

The siege ended Sept. 1, when the rebels surrendered after long negotiations with lawyers and other legal officials who promised them benefits available under the Italian legal code, including not losing various privileges accorded to long-term prisoners.

The court sentenced Tuti to 14 years and two months jail plus a $1,600 fine and Mario Ubaldo Rossi to 14 years and a $1,440 fine. Mario Marrocu drew a 14-year jail term and the other three rebels--Mario Cappai, Mario Tolu and Gaetano Manca--drew 12 years each.

Two men who smuggled guns to their brother were given eight- and four-year sentences.

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