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Philippine Catholics Keep Hopeful Attitude Despite Unsettling Times

December 12, 1987|MARK FINEMAN | Times Staff Writer

Last week, in his hospital bed, Rubino told a reporter that he misses his arm, that the steel pins in his leg are painful, and that he sometimes feels that both he and the price he paid for supporting Aquino have been forgotten by the president and her government.

Beneath a tinsel Christmas ornament and a wall sticker bearing the words "I love Jesus," Rubino leafed through a collection of tattered newspaper clippings and talked about how he had challenged the political warlords on Panay "to help bring democracy and peace back to our country."

Now, he said, things have changed. "Things are still not peaceful," he went on, "but Cory (Aquino) is good, and there is more hope than there was before. Things are better now than they were before, but I cannot really say why."

Rubino's wife, Aniolina, who has sat beside his bed every day for the last 18 months, nodded in agreement.

"The important thing," she said, "is that Florentino Rubino lived. And he is still alive. He can still see his six children. And he can still fight to recover. We still have hope."

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