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Young Men and Violence

March 10, 1988

I read Victoria Brown's article, " 'Fatal Attractions': The Way We Raise and Socialize Young Men Encourages Violence," (Op-Ed Page, Feb. 25) with interest. I must say, I agree with her wholeheartedly.

I also agree that if "Fatal Attraction's" Alex character had been a man, and the Dan character the woman, it would be a whole other viewpoint to the audience. Nobody would ever accept a married woman cheating on her husband, and being terrorized by the "other man." They would just say she deserved it, and side with the other man. I am in no way siding with the Glenn Close character, but I don't believe in double standards either.

Let's face it, there are a lot more Richard Farleys out there than there are Alexes. Men have been taught to react violently to wounded pride, but women have always been taught to repress their feelings.

I was victimized by some strange man on my way to work. Every day he would wait for me on the street corner, near my office. When I got close, he would walk towards me, muttering things under his breath and turning around and staring at me. When he did have the guts to open his mouth fully, he would say things like, "You look cold" or "Where are you going?" He became so annoying that I had to change my route going to work. Not to mention the fact that a few people pointed out to me, that he could very well have followed me home one day.

Women still have a long way to go with the police departments before they stop being blamed for being victimized. Too bad "Fatal Attraction" was not about a crazy man; it could have been a wonderfully awakening film.

JACKIE MULLINIX

Santa Monica

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