Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsIsrael

Terrorism in the Mideast

April 04, 1988

I have a very vital interest in Israel. I am an American native Jew whose daughter married an Israeli some years ago, and now I am the grandfather of four Sabra (native-born) grandchildren who have lived in Israel all of their lives, and two of them are now in the Israeli armed forces.

My wife and I have visited Israel on many occasions over the past 25 years and we never met an Arab (Palestinian or otherwise) we did not like, whether we asked for directions on the street of a stranger or visited in their homes.

We found these Semitic brethren to possess some of the same characteristics of friendliness, warmth and hospitality which are very common among Jews. I urge my fellow American Jews and the Israeli people to review the Old Testament, and learn how we lost the ancient land of Israel for almost 3,000 years.

Barbara Tuchman, the highly respected historian, in her magnificently written and richly documented "March of Folly" covering five separate and important segments of world history, tells us of a period in biblical history following the death of King Solomon. Rebohoam, son of Solomon, inherited the throne (approximately 930 BC). I quote, "The new king committed the act of folly that was to divide his nation and lose forever its 10 northern tribes, collectively called Israel."

The new king's reign for 22 years ultimately resulted in rebellion of the 10 northern tribes. From that time to 1948, the Jews suffered internal strife, civil war, conquest, hostilities and organized massacre among some of the many nations to which they had fled.

Israel's present course and its refusal to compromise reads like a repetition of ancient history. For the sake of Israel's survival I urge my fellow Jews, whether American or otherwise, to support our State Department's efforts to steer Yitzhak Shamir and his cabinet toward compromise, no matter who the Palestinians choose to represent them. After all, it would be a move only toward talking, not suicide.

WILL R. GOLDEN

Westlake Village

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|