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Fighting the War on Drugs in the U.S.

May 21, 1988

Let the Army, Air Force, Navy and Marines stop the dealers! Is that ever a fateful decision for this country. In just a few months members of Congress have done a complete turnaround on this issue as the November election draws near. Believing their own rhetoric about the war on drugs, they now want to bring in the high-tech military and let them have a few shots at the importers. Let's plea bargain with Noriega and send in the Army against the Americans.

Remember that most servicemen are basically kids--not seasoned law enforcement officers. It will be a sorry day when the first civilian aircraft is shot out of the sky for some infraction, mistaken identity or broken radio.

One of the most important differences between the U.S. and the countries that we look upon as dictatorial and abusive to their citizenry is the fact that we have trained police who must follow stringent constitutional guidelines.

The other countries have the national guard taking care of the business of keeping the criminals as well as the people in line. It will be a sorry day for democracy when the boys from Ft. Ord are seen patrolling the streets to keep us safe, probably from ourselves, since it is our own demand that creates the influx of drugs into this country.

As many experts have testified, legalization of drugs would be the end to drug cartels, dealer profits, drive-by shootings, crimes for money to buy drugs, and a huge portion of our national debt. After all taxes on drugs (as alcohol and cigarettes have shown) could add billions to the government's coffers. In addition, think about the savings in stolen property, police costs, court costs, and lives because of less violent crimes.

CHRIS CONSIDINE

Altadena

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