Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

MOVIE REVIEW : 'Killer Klowns' Fiendishly Clever

June 04, 1988|LEONARD KLADY

It's only natural to expect the worst from a film titled "Killer Klowns From Outer Space" (citywide). But this offbeat, black-comic homage to '50s "monster movies" demonstrates both above-average technical skill and large dollops of imagination.

The title pretty well indicates the film's attitude and storyline. The activity at small-town lover's lane stops momentarily when a flash of light streaks across the sky and disappears into a neighboring farmer's field.

Mike (Grant Cramer) and Debbie (Suzanne Snyder) break away to investigate and are surprised to find a circus tent in the middle of nowhere. Inside, rather than three rings, they discover what seem to be the inner workings of a spaceship with a popcorn maker and rows of cotton candy that cocoon the aliens' victims. The villains--angry clowns--are bent on capturing the couple before the horrible secret is divulged to unsuspecting townspeople.

The dozen or so clowns are a wonder to behold behind their garish clothing, painted faces and latex expressions. The juxtaposition of their toy-store arsenal and malevolent intent proves to be a tasty combination and the alien tricks concocted for the film often rival the best of the Cirque du Soleil.

"Killer Klowns From Outer Space" (MPAA-rated: PG-13, for violent action) is the brainchild of the Chiodo brothers (Stephen, Charles and Edward)--three young men whose inspiration appears to derive from a keen affection for the likes of "King Kong," "Godzilla," "Sinbad" and their ilk. While budget constraints occasionally show, they're more than offset by the rush of creativity fiendishly and cleverly at work.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|