Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

Jesse Jackson and No. 2 Spot

June 29, 1988

Frederick Dutton's "Be Honest About Why Jackson Is Denied," (Op-Ed Page, June 17) by suggesting that opposition to the Rev. Jesse Jackson as a vice-presidential candidate is based on racial issues, is an unwarranted stimulation of racial bigotry.

Had Rep. Pat Schroeder, U.N. Ambassador Jeane Kirkpatrick, Sen. Carl Levin, Sen. Arlen Specter or another prominent political or diplomatic figure, accumulated significant voter support, it would have represented, in large part, consideration of their record of experience and performance, rather than merely their rhetoric, sex, race, or religious affiliation.

For a great many voters, who would not and could not support a ticket offering Jackson the position, a heart beat away from the President of the United States, the pigmentation of his skin is not a consideration. Many blacks, as well as representatives of other minority groups, based upon their individual records have merited the full support of a large number of voters throughout the country without discrimination.

Although Jackson as an effective preacher may have forcefully directed attention to many significant problems and issues in our society, such as drugs, poverty, etc., his curriculum vitae notably omits reference to any personal qualifications for the solutions of these problems. His record of achievement, or lack of it, and source of personal income has not been presented in a manner warranting support. History is replete with the records of powerful and effective oratorical rhetoric that has achieved sufficient popular support from disenchanted minorities and resulted in the most devastating consequences.

It is appropriate that Jackson's personal qualifications and performance be properly evaluated, without the stigma of racial overtones. Our political system is based upon the separation of church and state. An impressive preaching record, without performance, is not the basis for qualifications for the highest office.

IRVING M. ROBBINS

North Hollywood

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|