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The 10 Longest Continuous Streets In The County

July 08, 1988|Clipboard researched by Henry Rivero / Los Angeles Times. Page designed by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times

1. STREET OF THE GOLDEN LANTERN: about 42 miles

Begins in Dana Point and goes north becoming, successively, Moulton Parkway, Irvine Center Drive and Edinger Avenue. Ends in Huntington Beach, just short of Huntington Harbour.

2. KATELLA AVENUE: about 41.7 miles

Begins at the Los Angeles/Orange counties border and goes east to Villa Park, where it becomes Villa Park Road, then Santiago Canyon Road and, finally, El Toro Road. Ends at Laguna Canyon Road.

3. LA PALMA AVENUE: about 23.75 miles Begins at Coyote Creek in La Palma, runs east through Anaheim Hills and ends in Yorba Linda at Featherly Regional Park.

4. EUCLID STREET: about 21 miles Begins in La Habra and proceeds south to Huntington Beach, where it becomes Ellis Avenue. Ends west of Edwards Street.

5. BEACH BOULEVARD: about 20.6 miles

Begins at Pacific Coast Highway in Huntington Beach, goes north and ends in La Habra at the Los Angeles County line.

6. LINCOLN AVENUE: about 19.75 miles Starts at Coyote Creek in Cypress, runs east, crosses the Costa Mesa Freeway and becomes Nohl Ranch Road, ending at Serrano Avenue in Anaheim.

7. IRVINE BOULEVARD/TRABUCO ROAD: about 19.25 miles

Starts in Mission Viejo at Marguerite Parkway, goes north and becomes Irvine Boulevard, then becomes 4th Street in Santa Ana, terminating at Raitt Street.

8. HARBOR BOULEVARD: about 19 miles Begins in La Habra, heads south through the county and ends at Newport Boulevard in Costa Mesa.

9. 17TH STREET/WESTMINSTER BOULEVARD: about 17.75 miles Begins in Seal Beach at San Gabriel River (begins as Westminster Avenue, changes to boulevard in Westminster), goes east and becomes 17th Street in Santa Ana, ending at Newport Boulevard.

10. MAGNOLIA AVENUE: about 17.5 miles Starts at Commonwealth Avenue in Fullerton (at the airport) and ends at Pacific Coast Highway in Huntington Beach.

Source: The Orange County Environmental Management Agency/Transportation, traffic engineering sector; Automobile Club of Southern California, and Thomas Bros. Maps.

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